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Posts Tagged ‘web design’

Ideas for finding a QUALITY DESIGNER to build your author website

So we’ve been talking for weeks now about the importance of your author website to connecting with prospective readers and making sales. Here’s the question: Who should do your website for you? I completely understand issues around budgeting and why – if you have some natural (or learned) skill at it – you might want to build your own website. WordPress offers excellent tools for creating a pretty nice-looking DIY site.

However, there are a number of good reasons for finding money in your budget to hire a professional Web designer. Among them:

  • Hiring a professional designer can save you time.
  • The Internet changes constantly – your website should reflect that dynamism and change with it.
  • A friend/relative will never prioritize your work the way a paid designer will.
  • Some designers have good SEO knowledge and skill that can benefit you.
  • A pro will be able to optimize your site for various browsers (and mobile devices).
  • If you want a site that makes a splash of any sort, you may need the design skills of a professional.
  • One thing that will make your site look great – and work well – is a finished appearance, which a professional designer can do for you.

So, once you decide you will make the plunge and hire a Web designer, how do you find the right one for your author website? To be honest, more than any other industry I’ve encountered, this field is rife with the sketchiest of feedback in terms of the quality of service providers. I long ago lost count of how many friends, colleagues, and clients have told me they were misled, ripped off, or had otherwise bad experiences with Web designers. That is just my experience, but ask around. It seems to be an unfortunate trend in the industry. What that means is that it is up to you to do your due diligence and make sure the designer you’re hiring is worth the money before you plunk down a dime.

Here are some things to consider before making a decision about which designer to hire.

GOALS FOR YOUR SITE. Is your site going to be mostly a brochure site where prospective readers can come and test drive a sample chapter or two? Are you looking to build a speaking career around your book? If so, that site is probably going to be somewhat different. Do you want a forum where readers can interact with each other? There’s no right or wrong, but you must know before you begin what you want your site to do. Then, go find a designer who can do it.

EXPERIENCE. The best designer may or may not have a ton of experience under their belt. Either way, you’ll want to look at sites they have already created to get a feeling for whether they synch with your goals for your author website. There may be something to be said for hiring a designer who specializes in author sites; however, you probably don’t want a cookie-cutter site that looks like a bunch of other authors’ sites, either. So make sure the designer you hire has the breadth, imagination, and listening skills to capture exactly what you want to create in your site.

As thenextweb.com puts it:

Web designers come in various shapes and sizes. Many specialize in one technology or another, and further, some specialize in specific visual styles or servicing a particular demographic. I know of a few designers who do nothing but political sites all day, every day — and they nail the style that they are known for.

While expertise in a style can be useful, and an agency or freelancer that targets your specific area might sound great, there are some who simply re-hash the same few designs over and over again. There’s a big difference between knowing a particular style of design well and innovating within that style, and trying to make a living as a one-trick pony with under-developed skills.

FREELANCE vs. COMPANY. The next thing you want to decide is whether you will hire a freelance designer or an actual Web design company. Each has its pros and cons, but in this industry neither is a sure bet – so again, do your research!

WHERE TO LOOK. The best place to begin is by asking other people (authors) whose sites you like: “Who did your site?” They will likely give you honest feedback about their experience working with their Web designers. Another place to look is on Web design galleries (a Google search can get you there). If either of those options doesn’t pan out, you can always try the freelance sites like Guru.com or eLance.com. The most important thing to remember is not to rush this process. Find a designer you feel good about, and whatever happens, go with your gut.

LOOK AT THE DESIGNER’s SITE. Make sure you visit the designers’ sites to see how they represent themselves on the Web.

Sitepoint.com recommends asking yourself the following questions, at minimum:

  • Do they tell you who they are and what they offer?
  • Do they appear to have the specific skills you need?
  • Do they have a portfolio you can view?
  • Does the designer describe their technical background?
  • How well do they use color on their own site?
  • Are their page titles appropriate and informative?
  • Is their site easy to navigate, and to get back to where you began?
  • Would your visitors/readers like a similar navigation system?
  • Are all their pages accessible, with no broken links?
  • Is the overall page design consistent?
  • Can you easily find the Contact Page and Site Map?
  • Are things on their site aligned properly?
  • Is the text on their site easy to read?
  • Do the pages load quickly?
  • Do all links open in new tabs or new windows?

PRICING & CONTRACTS. Other things to consider are pricing and the sort of contract they offer. Pricing for Web design runs the gamut from several hundred dollars to many thousands. Of course, part of that has to do with the complexity of the design, but unlike many other industries, a high fee is not always a guarantee of good work. I like how thenextweb.com puts it: “You might find that many really talented designers aren’t charging particularly expensive rates, so don’t take their previous work as an indicator of price.” And as far as a contract goes, it’s always a good idea to get someone with some legal acumen to look over any contract before you sign it.

REFERENCES. Lastly, remember to get references! Find a few people who’ve worked with the designer before and get input from them. Remember, though, consider the source. If three out of four tell you they had a great experience, there may be more to the story for the one who did not.

Yep, it’s going to take some work, but when you end up with a site you (and your readers) love, you will be glad you made the effort.

Happy hiring!

MARCIE

__________________

Download your complimentary copy of the highly useful Website Design & Marketing worksheet from Write | Market | Design.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

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Without an investment in SEO, your author website will be largely invisible.


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If you build it, they will come. Right? The people. Readers. Visitors. Purchasers. Customers. Repeat visitors. You write a good book, build a good website, and they will appear, as if by magic … won’t they? NO – not without good SEO.

Simply put, search engine optimization (SEO) is the organic (i.e., not purchased) process of improving a website or web page’s visibility and ranking in the search engines so that it is among the top results for the designated keywords. Your author website cannot succeed without it.

SEO is a giant subject/industry, and there are tons of people out there much better versed in it than we are. However, there are some basic concepts to keep in mind when looking to improve your site’s search engine optimization – and/or hire an SEO company to help you. One thing to remember is that SEO is a dynamic entity, meaning it changes all the time. The search engines recalibrate frequently, meaning that what you did yesterday to get to the top of the search rankings may be not be what you need to do to stay there.

There are a few things that remain consistent:

DOMAIN NAME

Make sure your domain name (and the title of your book, for that matter) incorporates your keywords.

KEYWORDS

  • Be selective and deliberate in your choice of keywords.
  • Learn to think like your potential readers. What kinds of words will the choose when looking for a book like yours?
  • Increase your search effectiveness by adding regional identifiers.

EXAMPLE: Use “Scottsdale first-time homebuyers” vs. just “real estate”

  • Remember the misspellings. If your keywords contain one that is often misspelled, include the misspelling to increase your chances of capturing that traffic.

META TAGS

Meta tags are the bits of information that lie behind the stuff your visitors see: descriptions of pictures, titles for your web pages; the name of the program used to create the page, descriptions of the page. Many search engines use the information stored in meta tags when they index web pages, which is why it is essential that your meta tags contain your keywords.

RELEVANT LINKS

While links have become less crucial as the Web has aged and matured, they still are an important aspect of driving traffic to your sites. Look to link with:

  • Similar industry sites
  • Sites that will send you traffic
  • Relevant sites

Make sure you know how to create a text link. If you learn no other coding ever, this piece is one that will serve you as long as you’re on the web.

<a href=“http://www.marciebrockbookmarketingmaven.com”>
book marketing blog for self-publishing authors
</a>

becomes

book marketing blog for self-publishing authors

NOTE: The text you want to become the link lies between the > and <.

BONUS TIP: Make sure you don’t chase people away from your site by having your links open in the same window. ALWAYS have your links open in a new tab or a new window. Do this by adding one little piece of code to your text link:

<a “target=blank” href=“http://www.marciebrockbookmarketingmaven.com”>
book marketing blog for self-publishing authors</a>

SEO-FRIENDLY CONTENT

Make sure your content naturally lends itself to good rankings. If you answer “no” to any of the following, you know what you have to do.

  • Is the very first thing appearing on your site searchable content that contains your keywords?
  • Does your content match your meta tags?
  • Do the links pertain to the content on your web pages?
  • Does your content contain your keywords (no more than 4 or 5)?
  • Does your content make sense?
  • Do you have high-quality information?
  • Will other website owners want to link to you because your site has good information?
  • Is your content easy to follow?

ON-PAGE OPTIMIZATION

On-page optimization means the things on the web page itself that you can control or do to increase your site’s search engine rankings. These include:

  • Page title
  • Banner text
  • Site navigation
  • Image descriptions
  • Keywords
  • Links

OFF-PAGE OPTIMIZATION

Off-page optimization means all other the things you can do to increase traffic to your site, such as:

  • Blogging
  • Article marketing
  • Social media
  • Submitting to directories
  • Mailers (i.e., the old-fashioned way!)
  • Speaking/book signings

For more detailed info on SEO, read every post on SEOBook.com. As we said, it’s a big topic, but investing the time to do it right will make the difference between people being able to find your site, and the sound of crickets chirping as you wait for the visitors to show up.

If you should decide to hire someone to help you with SEO, one big suggestion: DO YOUR RESEARCH! Check things like the SEO on the company’s own site. If they’re not showing at the top of the search engines in a search for “SEO + your city/state/region,” don’t hire them. Check references. Ask what you will get for your money, and make sure you feel comfortable with hiring that company. Reminder: Your gut instincts are usually correct.

If you’re just building your website, this is the time to get the SEO right. If you’ve had your site for awhile, it’s never too late to go back and make changes that could make a big difference.

MARCIE

__________________

Download your complimentary copy of the highly useful Website Design & Marketing worksheet from Write | Market | Design.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

PREVIOUS POSTS

Thursday, Oct.6 Does your author site give visitors a reason to COME BACK?

Monday, Oct. 3 – I’m on Facebook and have a blog – why do I still need a website?

Friday, Sept. 30 Is your author website DOA?

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Does your author site give visitors a reason to COME BACK?

_____________________________________

In a recent post, we discussed a list of problems that might be making your author website less than successful. Today will largely be a recap of that post, but with a more positive spin and some other tips about pages/items/content to include in your website to give your visitors more reason to (a) show up in the first place, (b) come back another time, and most importantly, (c) refer others to your site.

There is no right or wrong way to create a website, simply ways that can work to generate more traffic and sales for you. Below are suggestions for pages and content to include in your website. Feel free to use what makes sense, add others that are not included here, and ignore what doesn’t work for you.

PAGES

HOME. Your home page is likely the first page people will visit, unless you point them somewhere else with your social media, email, and other external links. You want the home page to be inviting and to give the first-time visitor a good idea of what your book is about, but you don’t want it to be cluttered or to try to do too much. Include an image of your book cover(s), a blurb or testimonial from as esteemed a source as possible, and buttons or links to all the other things you want the visitor to do/see.

EXCERPT(s). One of the precious things that’s been lost in the shift from brick-and-mortar stores to online book sales is the opportunity to wander the aisles, the chance to touch, feel, and smell the books, and the ability to pick them up and page through them. Amazon has done a decent re-creation of that organic bookstore experience with its “Look Inside” component. How can you do something similar for readers who visit your site?

AUTHOR BIO. We did a post recently about an author with a great book-signing venue the Paris Hotel in Las Vegas. Upon visiting the author’s website, however, to find out where she was from and how far she had to travel to get to the Paris Hotel in Las Vegas, we made the dismaying discovery that this author had no bio on her website. There’s no rule that says you must have one, but it seems a cheat to me, and unfair to your visitors, not to be willing to tell people a little about yourself, why you wrote the book, and/or your writing process.

STORE/PRODUCTS. OK say it with me: THIS SHOULD GO WITHOUT SAYING. As I wrote in a previous post, “Even if you can’t or don’t want to handle fulfillment personally, you must include links on your site to the places where your readers CAN purchase your book.” Otherwise, what’s the point of your website?

EVENT CALENDAR. This is another feature Amazon incorporates on its authors’ pages, and it’s a GREAT idea for you to use on your own site. Increase turnout at your book signings and events by making it easy for your readers to find out about them. Include the date, time, location, description of the event, signing protocol (many stores will only allow signing of books purchased at their venue), a map, and any other information that will help your reader get to you.

SPEAKING/WORKSHOPS. We will revisit this a little later, but if you’re not speaking on topics related to your book, you should be! If you are already doing so or are ready to begin include a list of speaking topics, the length of time of each presentation, and the sizes of the audiences you are able/willing to speak to. Make no mention of fees, as that is something that will get hammered out in later conversations, should someone contact you about speaking. The main goal here is let people know that you do speak on these specialty subjects.

MEDIA ROOM. A while back, we did a whole post about how to build a media room and why it’s  important to have one on your website. The primary reason is that it makes you more attractive to the media when all of the links and information they need is aggregated into one place. Rather than making them chase around your site looking for high-res images, links to your interviews, all of your media releases, etc., put them in one spot so they are easy to find. Are you seeing a trend here of making your site EASY for your visitors to use?

SITE MAP. As your site grows and you build more and more pages into it, it might make sense to include a site map, which is simply an overview of the whole site in outline format.

PAGE COMPONENTS

EMAIL CAPTURE BOX. If your site is lacking this element, I’d get your webmaster working on it ASAP, because without an email capture box, you are eliminating any future chance of reaching out to the people who have visited your site. We’ll be talking about the importance of list-building and how to do it in a future post, but for now, get that creativity cap on and come up with an interesting giveaway (NOT a subscription to your newsletter) that you can offer in exchange for capturing your visitors’ email addresses. This box should appear on the upper-right hand corner of EVERY page on your site.

CONTACT INFO. This is another one that should go without saying, but… Make it EASY for people to contact you. Unless you’re a hermit and don’t want to hear from the media, fans, bookstores, other authors, or people with joint venture opportunities, make it easy for people to get in touch with you. Don’t bury your contact information three levels down through your About page. Put it right up front, on EVERY page, where it’s clear and easy to read. Be sure to include all your social media contacts.

EASY NAVIGATION. Again, I reiterate, don’t reinvent the wheel on this one. We’ve come to expect navigation buttons at the left or along the top of web pages. Give people what they expect. Make sure your links work. And make sure you have links to the things that make sense. It probably makes sense to have a link to your store/products page on your home page. It may make sense to link to your excerpt(s) from your media room.

The best advice I can offer is to remember that you are not your visitor/reader. Do everything you can to get into THEIR head and view your site from their perspective. What would they want to read or see or learn by visiting your site? What do you want to read or see or learn when you visit other authors’ sites?

And speaking of other authors’ sites, visit them! Look and see what they’re doing that works well, and model it! Use video on your home page if it’s feasible and works for you. Use hand-drawn, whimsical art if it fits with the theme of your book.

You definitely want to keep your branding consistent, meaning your website should reflect the look and feel of your book(s), and vice-versa.

Make the most of your website, make it inviting, and connect with your visitors!

MARCIE

__________________

Download your complimentary copy of the highly useful Website Design & Marketing worksheet from Write | Market | Design.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

PREVIOUS POSTS

Monday, Oct. 3 – I’m on Facebook and have a blog – why do I still need a website?

Friday, Sept. 30 Is your author website DOA?

Monday, Sept.26 Internet Radio: Are interview opportunities just waiting for YOU?

Read Full Post »

I’m on Facebook and have a blog – why do I still need a website?

(Click twice SLOWLY – not a double-click – to enlarge the image.)

_____________________________________

Last time we examined the three vital components of any successful website:

  1. Design
  2. Content
  3. SEO

Today we’re going to back up to examine a more elementary question: With all the social media outlets available and the ease of managing a blog, why do I need a website?

First and foremost, you need a website to host YOUR content. Social media sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+ are a great way to connect with people, share relevant content, and establish yourself as an expert, but you are always at the mercy of that host site. There was a big hullabaloo a couple years ago when Facebook changed their fine print to say that, essentially, they would continue to own all the content (images, copy, video, etc.) that their users posted, even if the user cancelled their account. The pushback was intense and immediate, and Facebook retracted that fine print.

The thing to keep in mind, however, is that unless your content is posted on a site that YOU own, it could disappear at a moment’s notice. For example, say you breach a rule even one you weren’t aware existed. You run the risk of having your account/page frozen or removed. So then what happens to all of your content? If you don’t have it backed up somewhere else, it’s probably gone forever.

The same is true for a free blogging site like WordPress or Bloggger. Blogs are immensely useful and, in many ways, much easier to manipulate and manage than a traditional website. However, if your blog is ever suspended or blocked for any reason, there goes your access to your content and, more importantly, the content itself.

WordPress.org does offer software through which you can create a standalone blog/website that follows the general WordPress formatting, but allows you a great deal more flexibility than the free blog platform at WordPress.com. The significant difference is that, like a website, you must create a URL (the http://www.thisismywebsiteaddress.com part) and purchase hosting. Think about it like a rental house. Your address may be 2506 N. Evergreen Street, but you rent the house at that address. Your URL is the equivalent of the address. Hosting is the like the landlord to whom you pay rent for your house. Your site is sitting on their Internet land, and you pay them to use the space.

With a traditional website, or a standalone WordPress blog or website, you own the content and can rest much more secure in the knowledge that you won’t accidentally defy any rules and risk that site being wiped out. Regardless of WHERE you host your blog or site, though, you should always have a backup of your images and content somewhere other than on the Web, like your hard drive or a backup drive.

Other reasons to have a website in addition to social media and a blog:

  • More flexible ecommerce options (some free blog sites do not permit ecommerce functionality)
  • More options for things like video hosting (on a free blog, you must own the video and/or pay fee to post videos, Flash, or other content)
  • More options and flexibility regarding overall appearance
  • Limitless pages

The good news is that, if you’re doing it properly, your social media and blogging activity will drive traffic to your website. We did a post awhile back about the fact that there’s no single path into a marketing strategy. What’s important to note is that each component of your marketing strategy can and should feed the others. Your blog should feed traffic to your Facebook page which should link to your website which should have a link to your blog.

Your website doesn’t have to be super complex with tons of bells and whistles to be effective. Next time, we’ll suggested pages and components you might want to consider when building your site.

MARCIE

__________________

Download your complimentary copy of the highly useful Website Design & Marketing worksheet from Write | Market | Design.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

PREVIOUS POSTS

Friday, Sept. 30 Is your author website DOA?

Monday, Sept.26 Internet Radio: Are interview opportunities just waiting for YOU?

Thursday, Sept. 22 Rehearse your BOOK PITCH until it rolls off your tongue fluidly

Read Full Post »

Is your author website DOA?

(Click twice SLOWLY – not a double-click – to enlarge the image.)

_____________________________________

Once upon a time, the Internet was shiny and new and only certain people had websites. Mostly companies, maybe famous folks. For the average author, though, it was a reach. Fast forward to the cusp of 2012, and a website is no longer an optional luxury. It is an absolute necessity for doing business, particularly for a self-publishing author.

OK, so if this is basic stuff for you, feel free to skip ahead. You’ve read it here before: this should go without saying … but, after visiting a number of author sites lately, it occurs to me that some of these things very much need saying AGAIN.

Every successful website contains three discrete elements:

  1. Design
  2. Content
  3. SEO

DESIGN is the way the site looks. The colors. The fonts. The menus and buttons. The choice to utilize Flash, video, or other movable segments. It also incorporates functionality. How well is the visitor able to navigate the site, moving from page to page, or section to section? What is the overall feel, tone, and personality of the site? Is it elegant? Whimsical? Humorous? Thoughtful?

Remember, you are not your reader/Web visitor. When you are thinking about the design aspects of your site, consider your end users! Imagine you are your ideal reader, seeing your site for the first time. Does it invite you in? Make you want to look around and learn more? Or is it cluttered, busy, or schizophrenic?

CONTENT is the stuff that fills up your site: the words, images, videos, links, etc. YOU the website owner are responsible for creating the content for your site. This means that you must either take on a new/different writing role: copywriting. Or you must hire someone to do it for you. There are books, courses, videos, and every kind of tutorial you can imagine about copywriting for the Web, if it’s not your strong suit. Honestly, I think every author should have some skill in the copywriting arena. But there’s also a lot to be said for hiring a pro who can turn out magical copy for you almost effortlessly.

SEO, or search engine optimization, is the behind-the-scenes work that allows your site to be found on the search engines. If someone types in your name, does your website come up first, or is it way down on page 2 or 3, after all the other sites that are selling your book(s)? Although a good Amazon ranking is important to many authors, it’s equally important that YOUR site be found on the first page of results, particularly in a search for YOUR name. SEO is the tool that will make that happen. There are many things you can do to improve and enhance your site’s SEO, but if technology confuses, confounds, or frustrates you, it’s probably in your best interest to bring in a consultant to help you.

The interesting thing about building a successful website is that each of these three essential components is often so separate from the others. Many Web designers understand the concept of SEO, but do not specialize in it. As the owner of the site, you really want to act as the quarterback, pulling all the pieces together to make sure they are all working in harmony. This is easier to manage if you are writing the copy and choosing the images. If you’ve hired someone else to handle that portion, it becomes even more essential to make sure the Web design complements the copy and helps the SEO, that the copy contains good key words to boost your search rankings, and that your SEO expert is using appropriate strategies and key words.

We’ll be exploring all of this at greater length in the coming weeks. In the meantime, you may want to take tour of your website, scanning for some of the significant flaws that could be hampering your sales success:

  • No email capture. If you don’t have a way to capture the names of your site visitors, you are missing out on an obvious and essential marketing opportunity.
  • Using a newsletter as giveaway. Newsletters are passé. How many are you subscribed to? And how many do you read? Find something interesting and creative to give away.
  • No author bio. This one is just inexcusable. Sure, people are visiting your site to learn more about your books, but as an author, you’re in a unique position because your product is so personal. YOU wrote the book, so people also want to know about you. Reward them for caring with a nice bio and picture.
  • Hard-to-find contact info. Don’t make the user hunt for your contact info, especially not the media! Make sure to include all your social media links.
  • Too busy; too many sections/frames/boxes. You don’t have to put everything on the front page. Easy-to-use navigation buttons that steer your users where you want them to go will serve you much better than a junky, cluttered home page.
  • No call to action. What do you want your visitors to DO next? They won’t do it if you don’t tell them.
  • No samples of your writing. Like your bio, this is simply a courtesy to your readers. You want them to buy your books, don’t you? Well, how will they know they want to buy your books if they can’t first sample your writing?
  • Nowhere to purchase. I am banging my head against a wall as I write this one. Even if you can’t or don’t want to handle fulfillment personally, you must include links on your site to the places where your readers CAN purchase your book.
  • Irrelevant links and content. Make sure every aspect of your site is geared toward building your relationship with your reader. If you’ve written a travel guide, by all means, include links to travel resources. If, however, your book is about knitting, dump the travel/recipe/theatre/cosmetics  links, unless they are somehow relevant to your knitting book.
  • No event calendar. If you are doing book signings and events, make it easy for your readers to find them.

Surely you’ve found yourself frustrated by a website at some point in time. Remember that, and guard against doing the same thing to your visitors. Managing a website is a big job, but an important one. Review your site regularly to make sure your visitors are having such an optimal experience that they will visit again, and more importantly, tell others about you and your site.

MARCIE

__________________

Please contact us if you’d like help putting together your media kit, media releases, or book proposal. Free 30-minute consultation when you mention this post ($99 value).

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

PREVIOUS POSTS

Monday, Sept.26 Internet Radio: Are interview opportunities just waiting for YOU?

Thursday, Sept. 22 Rehearse your BOOK PITCH until it rolls off your tongue fluidly

Monday, Sept. 19 Want to be attractive to the media? Include a MEDIA ROOM on your website!

Read Full Post »

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