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Poetry Unexpected

I recently met a woman who fancies herself a storyteller. I can’t comment either way on her skill, as I’ve never seen or heard her perform. I was surprised, however, that she’d never heard of a poetry slam. In my opinion, the poets who are good enough to compete in juried slams are true storytellers. They must write their own work, develop one poem into a theatrical piece – performance art at its best – without the use of props, music, or anything other than the power of their own voice and body to bring the poem to life. The good ones are really good. Of course there always seems to be at least one angry feminist and a couple of sex poems in the mix – but even those are sometimes extraordinary. The trick, as an audience member, is being open to enjoying the poetry, relishing the art, losing yourself in the moment of the performance.

All that said, I’m not much of a poet, myself. Although I was a creative writing major in college, I skirted the poetry requirements (against my advisor’s advice), and have subsequently regretted it (as my advisor suggested I would). Nevertheless, I enjoy poetry performed aloud and definitely admire those who write it well.

This past weekend, poetry showed up in my hands in two unexpected episodes. First, I picked up a package at my PO Box that had been there for a few weeks. I was moving and kept thinking, “I’ll go stand in line next time I’m here,” every time I went to the post office for about three weeks. Finally, I made time to stand in line, and was rewarded with a book of poetry created by my 7-year-old niece’s class. It’s a hard-bound book with full-color illustrations. Charlotte wrote two poems: “Oak Tree” and “Fashion.”

Charlotte poem

The second event was the next day, in the parking lot at a local shopping mall. It was just starting to sprinkle when a man clad in green plaid shorts, a green rugby/football/soccer jersey, and brilliant green sneakers approached me. He explained that he was a vet just trying to earn $5 for a food box. He offered me a tattered piece of paper containing the poem, “Believe,” which he recited for me on the spot. Sure, the grammar is imperfect. The line breaks nonsensical. But the poem is sweet and he had such heart.

eric hamilton poem

He told me, as I offered the only cash I had in my purse, “It’s autographed, in case I become rich and famous someday.” As I accepted the wrinkled paper from him, I remembered my husband buying a couple poems a few years ago from a guy who’d come door-to-door through our neighborhood – the one we’d just moved away from. I’m pretty sure those were Eric Hamilton creations, as well.

So whether you write poetry or prose, fiction or nonfiction, are you taking steps to get your words out into the world? Have you ever attended an open-mic event and just read for the practice and experience of reading out loud in front of a group? It’s a little humbling, a little nerve-wracking, and a lot rewarding. Printed out your book or story in any version? Distributed it – for free or for money – anywhere? Here’s the thing. If a group of first graders can do it (yes, their teacher helped, but you’re a grown-up, so you can help yourself!) … if a homeless vet can do it … you can do it, too!

Here’s to taking your words to the street – or the mail!

Laura

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__________________Anatomy of a Book Launch

If you’re getting ready to launch your book and would like help to put together a successful event, download my free special report: Anatomy of a Book Launch. Then CALL me at 602.518.5376 to schedule your complimentary 15-minute consultation. It’s never too early to begin planning!

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SUNDAY INSPIRATIONS: Always be a poet…

Sunday Inspirations. Send us your favorite quote, image, poem, idea … anything that has been helpful or inspirational to your writing process. If we love it, we may use it as is, or take the inspiration and modify it in some way. Give us a link to your website or blog and we’ll be sure to give you credit! Email inspiration@writemarketdesign.com or post your suggestion in the comment section below!

Here’s today’s inspiration: “Always be a poet, even in prose.”

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________Anatomy of a Book Launch

If you’re getting ready to launch your book and would like help to put together a successful event, download my free special report: Anatomy of a Book Launch. Then CALL me at 602.518.5376 to schedule your complimentary 15-minute consultation. It’s never too early to begin planning!

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SUNDAY INSPIRATIONS: A good poem

New feature we’re starting here at Marcie’s blog: Sunday Inspirations. Send us your favorite quote, image, poem, idea … anything that has been helpful or inspirational to your writing process. If we love it, we may use it as is, or take the inspiration and modify it in some way. Give us a link to your website or blog and we’ll be sure to give you credit! Email inspiration@writemarketdesign.com or post your suggestion in the comment section below!

Here’s today’s inspiration: The world is never the same once a good poem has been added to it.

good poem

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below."Practical Philanthropy" book cover

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Check out Laura’s newest book, Practical Philanthropy: How ‘Giving Back’ Helps You, Your Business, and the World Around You. A percentage of all book sales is donated to Art4TheHomeless.org and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.

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Please  A book marketing haiku

As you may recall, I’m not much of a poet. I hated poetry in college but now wish I’d listened to my advisor and taken more of it. In response to a reader comment, I did a post with several ideas for how to market your poetry. Then I came across this quote by Seth Godin, which is a nice reminder that most poets and bloggers are in it for the love of their craft:

“Just as we don’t spend a lot of time worrying about how
all those poets out there are going to monetize their poetry,
the same is true for most bloggers.”
— Seth Godin

I am tackling poetry again in today’s blog as a part of the 2012 Word Count Blogathon. Today’s is Day 21 in the 31-day blog challenge. The theme for today is haiku, which means … you guessed it. I’ve written one.

For those unfamiliar with this style of poetry, a haiku is a very short form of Japanese poetry that typically possesses three qualities:

  • The essence of haiku is cutting, which often is represented by the nearby positioning of two images or ideas with a “cutting” word between them that serves as a sort of verbal punctuation mark signaling the break separating them.
  • A haiku consists of 17 syllables or sounds: 5, 7 and 5 respectively.
  • Haiku traditionally contain a seasonal reference.

According to WikiHow, “a haiku is meant to be a meditation of sorts that conveys an image or a feeling.” In reading many haiku (there is no plural word for haiku), you will notice they either present one idea for the first two lines and then switch quickly to something else, or they reference one thought with the first and last line, and another thought with the middle line. “Haiku has been called an “unfinished” poem because each one requires the reader to finish it in his or her heart,” the WikiHow article continues.

Like any writing or forms of art, haiku takes practice. I am not practiced at it. One of Marcie’s subscribers, however, is quite practiced: read Five Reflections’ daily haiku here.

OK – without any further delay, the unveiling…

To sell books I work

Branding and marketing them

Won’t you buy one, please?

Though there is no seasonal reference, I do think it hits the idea of conveying a feeling, a somewhat plaintive pleading to make all my efforts worthwhile. See, I can even tie in book marketing to a poetry challenge – and I’ll bet you can, too!

The idea is to learn to think like a marketer. Not that the first words out of your mouth when you meet someone new are: “Hi. I wrote a book. Do you want to buy a copy?” But that you keep marketing at a low simmer on the back burner, so that when an opportunity or idea you can leverage into an opportunity does show up, you will recognize it and be ready and able to act on it.

If you’d like to take a break from your own book marketing and try your hand at haiku, definitely read the WikiHow piece on writing a haiku.

Happy haiku!

MARCIE

SOURCES

http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Haiku-Poem

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiku

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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In honor of our 1-year anniversary (May 2, 2012), we’re hosting the Author Blog Challenge! It starts June 2 and is open to published authors, authors-in-progress, and would-be authors. Come check us out and register today!

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Ideas for marketing your POETRY during National Poetry Month

I mentioned in a recent post that while I’m not much of a poet, I do recognize and delight in good poetry – when read aloud or performed at a slam. Well, it’s the perfect time for me to go out and get some exposure to poetry, because April is National Poetry Month. Established by the Academy of American Poets in 1996, National Poetry Month is a time when publishers, booksellers, literary organizations, libraries, schools, and poets around the country organize to celebrate poetry and its vital place in American culture. Thousands of businesses and nonprofit organizations also participate with readings, festivals, book displays, workshops, and other events.

If you’ve ever thought about dabbling in poetry, I found a great little book called Poems from Homeroom: A Writer’s Place to Start, by Kathi Appelt. It has three parts: Introduction, Poems, and Writing Prompts. Each of the hundreds of writing prompts ties back to one of Appelt’s poems, on subjects ranging from cyberlove to the driver’s license to the science fair. This poem caught my eye because it reminds me of someone I used to know:

What He Took with Him

His Pink Floyd T-shirt and two more,
a week’s worth of clean boxer shorts,
his toothbrush and half a tube of Colgate
with baking soda, a stick of Old Spice
Original, same brand his father used,
forty-one dollars and some change,
a fresh pack of Camel Lights in a box,
a book of matches, some mismatched socks,
the
Tao Te Ching, one blue marble, his mother’s heart,
his father’s broken one, all their dreams.

What he left behind:
the cream-colored cat, wild in her loneliness,
his CD collection, quiet; the air,
wondrous for his being there.

What follows next are some ideas for marketing your poetry. For those non-poets still hanging with me, you’ll probably want to keep reading, as many of these things would apply to other genre,s as well. Some are fairly unsophisticated, some tried and true. Try the ones that appeal to you and let the others go. My goal is simply to inspire you to go out and find a way to make a name for your poet self and let the world know about your work.

1. Start a Notebook on Poets.org. The Poets.org site allows users to build their own personal online commonplace book out of the materials on their site. The Notebooks feature serves as a scrapbook, enabling you to bookmark links to things like poems, biographies, upcoming events, and audio clips. Users create a user name and password and are able to create as many Notebooks as they want.

2. Participate in an Open Mic Night. Yes, lots of poets do them – but if it’s the only exposure I really get to new poetry, it may be the only exposure a lot of people get to new poets and poetry. Sometimes open mic nights have a featured reader or writing workshop, but generally there is a sign-up sheet for anyone interested. Each poet is called to step up to the microphone and read a poem or two. Check your local newspaper or library, ask at your local coffee house, or scan Meetup.com to find an open mic night in your area.

3. Be a guerilla marketer: put your poem on bookmarks or postcards and leave them in unexpected places.

In my view, books should be brought to the doorstep like electricity, or like milk in England: they should be considered utilities, and their cost should be appropriately minimal. Barring that, poetry could be sold in drugstores (not least because it might reduce the bill from your shrink). At the very least, an anthology of American poetry should be found in the drawer of every room in every motel in the land, next to the Bible, which will surely not object to this proximity, since it does not object to the proximity of the phone book.
— Joseph Brodsky, from An Immodest Proposal

Find unusual places to leave your poems: with the receipt for your dinner when you go out to eat, in restrooms of public venues, on subways and buses, in coffee houses and art galleries. Just get a bunch and carry them with you everywhere!

4. Another term for guerilla marketing is mischief marketing. Embrace the mischievous child in you and write a line or two of your poetry on a public sidewalk. Get some really colorful chalk (or something that will contrast well with your chosen sidewalk). Choose a large, clean piece of sidewalk or pavement to write on. Add drawings or arty flourishes for added interest and fun. If you’re not really an artist, do you have an artistic friend you could enlist to help? Make sure you include your name, Facebook link, or website.

5. Organize a reading or slam. Earlier we talked about participating in an open mic night. That’s phase one. The next step is putting your name on the whole show. This will take some initiative and an investment of time and perhaps money – but it will also help you begin to create a brand as a poet who supports other poets. Invite poets whose work you admire or select poets you know from writers groups, workshops, local colleges, and universities (both professors and students), or announce a call for readers via Craigslist and your social media outlets. Consider your local library, coffee shop, bookstore, art gallery, bar, or performance space for venues.

6. Teach a poetry class. This may not be for everyone, but if you have a gift for writing poetry and the ability to share some of your secrets with those who want to learn, it could be a great way to further band yourself. Community colleges are often looking for interesting new classes and can be fairly easy to get into. Also consider simply renting some space at your local library or bookstore meeting room. Put ads on Craigslist or Meetup and use your social networks to promote your class.

7. Add a line, stanza, or whole poem to your e-mail signature. This is a simple thing to do and, while it may not make a huge difference immediately, the branding imprint can add up over time. Consider the fact we must see a new advertising message about 21 times before it really registers with our conscious brians – which is why you see the same commercials again and again and again, often through lots of different media. Your e-mail signature can have a similar effect.

8. Submit, submit, submit!! Get a copy of the 2012 Poet’s Market, published annually by Writer’s Digest. Poet’s Market contains detailed information about more than 1,200 poetry publishers (book publishers, magazines, newsletters, journals, etc), including contact information, the kinds of poetry they’re looking for, deadlines, and submission guidelines. Whether your goal is to publish individual poems or a book, Poet’s Market has all the information you need to find the right publisher.

BONUS IDEAS

All of the following come from a post called “How to Market Your Poetry Online” from The World Class Poetry Blog. These are just the first few sentences of each tip the author shared. PLEASE visit the actual post for the rest of the info, as it is REALLY good!

  • When you get an acceptance letter, buy yourself a beer (or a coffee if you don’t drink); if you’re Mormon, drink Kool-Aid. DO NOT publish your poem on your blog before it appears in the journal that accepted it.
  • Record yourself reading your poem. All you need is a little digital recorder. Nothing fancy, just a little digital recorder you can get at RadioShack for $40.
  • Write a few articles about poetry. Nothing elaborate, just short pieces about the kind of poetry you like, who your influences are, etc. However, avoid making the article about you; make it about your subject.
  • Get an inexpensive webcam or digital camcorder and make a video of yourself reading your poem. Upload the video to YouTube, Google Video, Yahoo! Video, and other video sharing sites.
  • Repeat all of the above for every poem you get published.

As with any book, your goal with your poetry is to get the word out there about your work so that the right people can find you and buy it – or hire you to perform at their company picnic. Set your goals first, and then create a plan. Poetry may be a bit more challenging than other writing to sell, but if you have the desire and a well-crafted plan, you can do it.

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

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TODAY: Intersection between the past and the future

I was thinking the other day how far I’ve come in the last 10 years, both in developing my business and as a person. The last 10 years saw both my parents pass on, and me finally create a home of my own, meet my life partner and marry him. I learned marketing and bookmaking and found my voice as a writer. I learned that although language and communication are innate skills at which I excel, I have an even stronger skill: relating to people. I think that’s why I like this blog so much. It’s certainly why I enjoy networking and love teaching workshops and seminars. The ancillary benefit for me is knowing I’m helping others achieve their dreams of writing and publishing their own books.

In realizing how far I’ve come, I also had to acknowledge how little I knew when I began this journey. Writing and communication have always been innate skills for me – but I had to learn to be an editor. I had to learn what marketing meant, why it is important, how to go about it, and how to teach it to others. I had to learn how to network and grow my business. And along the way, there have of course been missteps.

While I don’t advise looking back with regret or anxiety about what we haven’t yet accomplished, it’s only in reviewing the past that we can truly see how far we’ve come and where we have succeeded. If you’ve published a book, that’s a pretty significant accomplishment in its own right. You can look at the physical book – or see the eBook for sale online – and know you’ve achieved something pretty big. But the book was a process – it didn’t come together in an instant. First you had the idea. Then you started writing. Slowly, the book itself took form.

If you’re still writing your book, it may be harder to see the achievement – but I promise you, it’s there. Think back five years. Where were you then? How far along was your book at that point? What inspired you to begin writing it in the first place? What kinds of research have you put into it? Where have you gone for support or encouragement?

If you want to finish your book, I encourage you to stop viewing it as a singular gigantic project. First, create a goal date by when you will finish writing it. Tell people you’re working on it and ask them to check in with you every once in a while to see how you’re doing. Then add another date for editing. Another date for book cover and design. Another date for typesetting. Another date for printing. Make a task list with dates, and then get out of your way. Take each task, one at a time, and your book will unfold before you.

My coach tells me that we often quit just as we’re about to make our biggest leaps, because those big leaps are scary and it’s much easier to maintain the status quo. That’s why I find this life review process so powerful. When I look back to what I knew, who I knew, how little I knew 10 years ago, I can see how much I’ve grown and developed. I didn’t know nearly what I know today, but I knew enough to begin my business. I probably wouldn’t have been able to write this blog even three years ago – but I’m writing it now. And I’m sharing the new things I learn as I learn them, because trust me – I know I don’t know everything!

I was scrolling through topics from TedTalks this morning and came across one under the Storytelling theme that caught my eye, because the speaker’s name is the same name as a new client of mine: Sarah Kay. This Sarah Kay is an innovative young woman who pioneered Project V.O.I.C.E. (Vocal Outreach Into Creative Expression), a program that encourages people, particularly teenagers, to use spoken word as a tool for understanding the world and self and as a medium for vital expression.

One of my favorite passages from her presentation:

I became obsessed with stories, because it was through stories that I was able to see through someone else’s lens, however briefly or imperfectly. And I started craving hearing other people’s experiences because I was so jealous that there were entire lives I was never going to get to live and I wanted to hear about everything that I was missing.

And by transitive property, I realized that some people were never going to get to experience what it felt like to be a teenage girl in New York City, which meant what the subway ride after your first kiss feels like, or how quiet it gets when it snows. And I wanted them to know; I wanted to tell them.

It could be seriously easy to look at Sarah Kay’s achievements and start to dis on my own, to think, “Oh, she’s only 22 and look at what she’s accomplishing already. I haven’t done anything like that and I’m twice as old as she is.” However, I know better. One of the gifts of my last 10 years has been an appreciation for where people are – myself included. I’m not perfect at it, but I’ve set it as a goal and I’m improving daily at acknowledging that each of us has chosen a particular path to follow, and one path is not better, smarter, more elevated than the next. Each path is just different.

Sarah Kay starts her program by explaining that when she was little, she thought she would be able to do everything she wanted to in life – that there would be time and opportunity to be a princess-ballerina-astronaut. One thing I caught myself envying is that she had arty parents, both photographers. I had parents who encouraged my sister and me to become a vet and an attorney, respectively, because they were “good jobs.” Our mom and dad had much less concern for our Renaissance nature or desire for fulfillment than that we “succeed in life.” And we are succeeding – just not in the way that they would have had us do it.

I have a friend who is an international writer and photographer. I remember gazing with rapt awe at some of the black and white prints he’d taken of a recent trip to Peru. Before I met him, I’d always thought I wanted that globetrotting, cosmopolitan life. I suppose I did it to a lesser degree, living and working in the NYC area for almost 8 years. But I never chose the Peace Corps, not did I spend a semester abroad, like my niece is doing right now in Italy. I didn’t even go to college out of state. When I look back on my life, I can clearly see that I made some safer, more comfortable choices – but I don’t regret them because I know that if I had really wanted to roam the world, I would have.

Here’s the interesting thing. That George Eliot quote is true:

Yes, I have a husband now. We have 5 four-legged creatures who depend on us for their sustenance. But neither of those negates the possibility of travel, the possibility of greater exploration or activism or interconnectedness to the rest of the world. Sure, it may involve more planning than just throwing some jeans and underwear in a backpack and taking off for six months like my good friend Ashley did a few years ago. She’s another whose life I used to envy.

Today, I stand at the center of my life, able to look back at the past and see how far I’ve come – and able to look forward to the future and decide where I want to go next. You can do the same.

Happy reviewing … and planning ahead!

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

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Thinking we know everything on a topic is a pretty sure sign that we don’t

Much of this content was originally posted on my other blog on October 19, 2009.

This post was inspired by the newest follower of the Marcie Brock blog, a gal named Erin who writes a blog called A Poet’s Heart. In seeing the name of her blog, I almost immediately thought, “I wonder if she’ll get anything out of my posts because I don’t really know very much about marketing poetry.” Perhaps I have bought into the idea that poetry is difficult to market, and because I’m not a poet, I don’t know anything about it. Will have to ponder that one a bit – because I’m willing to bet I can come up with some useful marketing ideas for poets, both from my own creative well and by researching what other poets have done and are doing.

My next thought was that I’m not very good at poetry. This, too, is probably a belief I’ve bought into because I never really gave myself permission to delve into poetry. I realize as I type this that I also have a habit of telling people that I’m pretty good at dialogue, but I’m not much of a fiction writer. Wow – how our own thoughts can limit us!

I grew up a researcher, so nonfiction came naturally to me, which is perhaps why I got my degree in that aspect of creative writing. I do believe we each have gifts – natural leanings toward one genre or specialization over others. However, if you catch yourself thinking, as I have, “I’m not very good at __________,” PLEASE STOP! Don’t feed your brain junk food! If there’s a genre that interests you and you don’t know much about it, go find a mentor, read a book, take a class, or otherwise explore it. Just don’t tell yourself that you’re not good at it.

Which leads into our topic of the day…

Imagine being 21 years old and thinking you know everything. Perhaps it’s just a human right of passage, a phase we all go through. I have relatively few regrets in my life, but one of them is that I didn’t listen to my college advisor when he told me I needed to take more poetry. “No, sir, I don’t. It says right here in the course catalogue that I have to take only two poetry classes to graduate with my degree in nonfiction writing – and I’ve taken two poetry classes.”

My advisor put on his glasses and examined the line I pointed to with my know-it-all index finger and said, “Well, I’ll be damned.” He seemed to know he had lost the argument, but he tried valiantly to change my mind. His exact words were, “You will regret it later if you don’t take more poetry.”

And my smarty-pants response was, “No, I won’t.” I hated poetry and was terrible at writing it. I found it tedious and boring and I just didn’t see the point. So at the time, from my very limited vantage point, I thought I knew how I would feel in the future. Was I ever wrong!

Turns out, sometimes it’s a good idea to listen to the older, wiser advisors in our lives – particularly since this advisor was none other than Richard Shelton.

Richard Shelton is an Arizona writer, poet, and emeritus Regents Professor of English at the University of Arizona. He has written nine books of poetry; his first collection of poems, The Tattooed Desert, won the International Poetry Forum’s U.S. Award. His 1992 memoir, Going Back to Bisbee, won the Western States Book Award for Creative Nonfiction in 1992, became a New York Times Notable Book, and was selected for the One Book Arizona program in 2007. In 2000, Shelton received a $100,000 grant from the Lannan Foundation to complete two books. You can practically count the living poets who get paid well for their work on one hand – so this accomplishment alone is astonishing!

If that weren’t enough, Shelton’s poems and prose have appeared in more than 200 magazines and journals, including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, and The Antioch Review and have been translated into Spanish, French, Swedish, Polish, and Japanese.

Back in 1974, Shelton established a writer’s workshop at the Arizona State Prison, and a number of books of prose and poetry written by men in Shelton’s prison workshops have been published. His latest book, Crossing the Yard: Thirty Years as a Prison Volunteer details this experience. It won the 2007 Southwest Books of the Year award.

Subsequent to ignoring Professor Shelton’s advice and graduating from the University of Arizona, I have developed a fascination with poetry. I doubt it will ever be my best form of writing, but I have unending respect for the gifted poets who do it well, if only because they seem to make it appear so effortless. As a result, I can’t help but wonder what I might have learned from Professor Shelton if Id simply had the common sense not to think I already knew everything about poetry I would ever need to know. While he may not come to the top of my mind as one of the most influential people in my life, I really wish I’d heeded his advice back then: “You need to take more poetry.” (And I still regularly recall his pet peeve about the word lifestyle and have all but stricken it from my vocabulary.)

My life is wonderful now – but it could have been richer, fuller, more lyrical, and filled with much more beauty and joy if I’d hadn’t thought I knew it all when I was 21. The good news is that it’s never too late to learn something new! I think I see a poetry workshop on my horizon…

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

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