Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘guerrilla marketing’

The book marketer’s “bucket list”

“Write down 10 things you would do in
your life
if you had absolutely no fear.
Then pick one of them and do it.”
— Steve Chandler

OK – challenge time. We’ve been at this blog a year now. Whether you’ve been reading for 11 months or 11 days, it’s time to get out from behind your computer and put some of these ideas we’ve been discussing into action.

I hereby alter Steve Chandler’s quote thusly:

Write down 10 things you would do
to market your book if you had absolutely
no fear. Then pick one of them and do it!

Let’s get a list going, right here and right now:

  • Make a book trailer even though I don’t know much about video editing.
  • Start speaking to civic and community groups that include members of my audience, even if I’m terrified of public speaking.
  • Do a radio or TV interview, even if I’ve never done one before.
  • Create a mischief marketing campaign like blanketing the parking lots at an MLB game with postcards to promote my new baseball book, even if I’m worried I’ll get “in trouble.”
  • Interview someone famous in my market or industry, even if I’m worried they won’t want to talk with me.
  • Wear a costume related to one of the characters in my novel to a crowded shopping center and hand out bookmarks, even if I’ll feel silly.
  • Ask someone I admire to write a guest post for my blog, even if I’m incredibly shy.
  • Fork over the $200 to host a book signing at my local indie bookstore, even if that’s a lot of money and I don’t have a guarantee it will go well.
  • Ask someone famous for a blurb for my book, even if I don’t yet know how to contact them.
  • Spray paint my book marketing message where it counts, even if it’s…

I’ll admit some of these ideas are scarier or bigger envelope-pushers than others; it really all depends on your comfort level. I personally have no problems speaking in public, but it’s said that for some people, the fear of public speaker is greater than their fear of dying!

The point is to choose one idea from YOUR list of fears and overcome it by TAKING ACTION!

I recently signed up to be an organizer for a political campaign. That means asking a whole lot of people who don’t necessarily want to talk with me if they’re registered voters. Tap the vocal ones from the opposing party and … oops … I could set off a mini-incident without even trying. The other thing is that I get a lot more rejections than I do signer-uppers because that’s just the nature of the work. Let me tell you – this is pushing me outside my comfort zone in a BIG way.

One of my new voter-reg buddies is fearless – she tells anyone who’s not registered and doesn’t want to register that they’re giving away their power if they don’t vote. I agree – and used that line a couple times myself this weekend … to no avail. I will persist, though, because this is a skill I really want to improve. How can I be a successful team leader if I can’t walk my talk?

Another thing I want to do to push past my current comfort level is take an improv class and/or a class in comedy. I can stand up and give you a compelling, from-the-heart speech – but I’m no Kristin Wiig and get pretty tense at the idea of being silly onstage. SNL just lost one of its greatest performers ever as Kristin left the show to pursue other opportunities. She’s my hero, though – as she exemplifies fearlessness to me.

Who’s your role model? What did they do to overcome their fear and do it anyway? Ready, fire, aim – as my friend and mentor David Hepburn used to say. Otherwise, there’s an awfully strong chance you’ll stand around all day aiming and never quite get around to the firing part.

Happy fear-conquering!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

In honor of our 1-year anniversary (May 2, 2012), we’re hosting the Author Blog Challenge! It starts June 2 and is open to published authors, authors-in-progress, and would-be authors. Come check us out and register today!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Marketing lessons from the cast of “Saturday Night Live”

A couple days ago I did a post about guerrilla marketing. I ended the post by encouraging you: “Guerrilla/mischief marketing is just a piece of the puzzle, but an important piece, so please don’t neglect it out of fear of looking a little foolish. Just relax and have fun with it.”

The “fear of looking foolish” part got me to thinking about people who look foolish for a living, and the lessons we can learn from them. From the title of the post, perhaps you think I’m talking about Jimmy Fallon, who’s now pitching for Capital One, but that’s not really who I have in mind. I’m thinking more along the lines of the current cast – people who get paid to stand up in front of a live audience every week on a show that’s broadcast to millions around the world and sometimes make utter fools of themselves.

If you saw the movie Bridesmaids, you saw the softer, subtler side of Kristen Wiig – but if you watch Saturday Night Live with any regularity, you get to see her wacky and sometimes just plain bizarre performances as a whole host of zany characters. Here’s the thing: I’m sure at some point in her career (or life), Kristen Wiig – as well as Fred Armisen, Bill Hader, Seth Meyers, Bobby Moynihan, Andy Samberg, Jason Sudeikis, Kenan Thompson, and the others – must have thought, “This is soooo embarrassing.” But she pushed herself beyond the fear and developed an amazing talent.

Now I’m not suggesting you abandon writing to become an improv or sketch comic – unless it’s what you really want to do. But I am suggesting that getting over ourselves and our fear of embarrassment are really good ideas if we ever want to grow beyond our comfort zones and achieve any real measure of success. As you well know, the best product doesn’t always dominate – it’s the product with the best marketing. This is also true of books. As an author-marketer, how willing are you to go all out to sell your books? Would you don a penguin costume? Would you walk up to someone famous you met by chance and pitch them? Would you make a hilarious video? Or are you too worried about what people might think?

Seriously – can you ever imagine an SNL production meeting when they’re assigning new skits and hearing Kristin Wiig say, “No – I’m not doing that because it will make me look stupid”? If you’ve never seen her, make it a point to do so. Whether you don’t like SNL, you watch something else in that time slot, or you’ve just got a way more active social calendar than I do, go find an episode that features Kristin Wiig and study it! There are always reruns, Hulu, YouTube – really, you have no excuse.

And then if you’re inspired, go join a Toastmasters club, take an improv class, buddy up with a stand-up comic, or just practice talking to strangers in line at the grocery store. Chances are you will uncover something fantastic if you just give yourself permission to look a little foolish.

Happy comfort-zone busting!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

Read Full Post »

Mischief marketing for authors: A call to action!

In the past few days, I’ve touched on a couple methods of mischief marketing for authors – marketing ideas, techniques, or concepts that push the envelope and break the rules a bit, in a way that gets attention without causing any real harm or damage. Another term you may have heard for it is “guerrilla marketing,” which is described by its founder, Jay Conrad Levinson, as “an unconventional ways of pursuing conventional goals. … [T]he soul and essence of guerrilla marketing … remain, as always, achieving conventional goals, such as profits and joy, with unconventional methods, such as investing energy instead of money.”

Some of the guerrilla ideas we’ve mentioned over the past few months include:

None of them is particularly expensive or complicated, and some require more nerve than others. But each is creative, attention-getting, and something you can do. If you don’t like these ideas, chuck them in favor of something that suits you better. But as someone over at the SM2 blog recently wrote: “This mischief marketing is a tricky balancing act that requires total willingness to fail, or perhaps worse, to sink without a ripple. But it is also fun to do and say something about the companies behind it. Sense of humor anyone?”

Levinson’s first book on the subject, Guerrilla Marketing, was the beginning of an empire. You might say this guy walks his talk. He (along with a slew of expert coauthors) now has 58 titles to his credit, which have been published in 62 languages. Some of the various titles include:

  • Guerrilla Social Media Marketing
  • Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters 3.0
  • Guerrilla Marketing for Nonprofits
  • Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green

Here’s some advice for authors looking to add some guerrilla to their marketing from Guerrilla Marketing for Writers: 100 No-Cost, Low-Cost Weapons for Selling Your Work, by Levinson, Rick Frishman, Michael Larsen, David L. Hancock:

Don’t think like a writer who has something to say; think like an author who has a lifetime of books, products, and services to sell – a writer who knows what it takes to make books sell and will be totally committed to doing it.  Then you will be a guerrilla marketer.

Another book I really like is Mischief Marketing: How the Rich, Famous, & Successful Really Got Their Careers and Businesses Going, by Ray Simon. Here’s an excerpt from the introduction:

Many of the anecdotes you’ll see in these pages will act as templates. In other words, they’ll illustrate by example how you can adapt the strategies embodied in the tales to fit your own situation; how you can tailor the tales and the tactics to fit your own business, personal, or social goals.

* * *

For instance, it may not be your style to break into a movie studio. That’s understandable. But there are similar things you can do to accomplish what the Spielberg templative tale is essential about: evoking an aura of credibility. On the Internet, for example, you could craft a website that is as impressive as any produced by a major corporation, and such a website can do for you what the mischievously makeshift office at Universal Studios did for Spielberg.

Want to download a 14-page excerpt of Mischief Marketing before you buy it? Click here.

And lastly, in my research, I came across a brand new (January 2012) eBook on the topic by a guy named Nathan Dube: Music, Mischief and Marketing: A Guerrilla’s Guide for the Creative Protagonist. Now, it’s not perfectly edited (yes, my personal peccadilloes rise to the surface every now and again), but it has lots of excellent content. I particularly liked this bit of encouragement for people (or in our case, authors) to find their own style, voice, and identity as marketers. Hmmmm… not so different from finding your voice as an author, right?

Part of what makes one a truly great marketing professional is their ability to develop their own unique style. By experimenting with different techniques, you will eventually find what is “right” for you, at which point you will begin to establish your own identity within your craft.

Let’s review a few of these aforementioned techniques which may be of use to you:

  • Perspective management
  • Guerrilla marketing
  • Self education
  • Projecting thought leadership
  • Leveraging social channels
  • Developing egregores
  • Building trust
  • Projecting a spirit of service
  • Projecting your humanity

If you want to know what an egregore is, you’ll just have to buy the book. 🙂

Savvy book marketing is all about using every tool at your disposal to get your name out into the world and sell more books. Guerrilla/mischief marketing is just a piece of the puzzle, but an important piece, so please don’t neglect it out of fear of looking a little foolish. Just relax and have fun with it.

Happy mischief-making!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: