Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘book marketing strategies’

Today’s  marketing is ANYTHING but a linear process

Not all that long ago, it was virtually a given when studying marketing to learn about the sales funnel the top-down model of building a customer base.

Social media has largely changed that. A fantastic article from Marketing Profs details this shift and the emerging winding road that is now the “client cycle.” Whereas metrics knowing WHERE your clients and customers are coming from are still important, the methods for tracking them has changed in response to the new marketing. According to Marketing Profs:

Whether they’re interested in a new pair of shoes or a new virtual private network, future customers can first engage with a potential purchase in many ways. That engagement could be via a billboard with a URL that they type into their smartphone’s mobile browser, or a click on a Facebook wall post from a friend’s feed, or a search on Google.

* * *

The best marketers can hope to do in such an environment is to manage the process so that even though all roads may not lead to Rome, eventually all roads lead to, and through, digital “toll booths” of content and information exchange.
What this means is there’s no right way or wrong way to begin a book marketing campaign, and there is no correct point of entry. That being said, you have to start somewhere. Do your research to determine where YOUR readers are most likely to come from. I still believe a blog is one of the fastest ways with the best return when it comes to staking a claim for your market, but you must determine the right way for you.
f
Once you understand that marketing is not a linear process, you can embrace the holistic approach necessary to create your various on- and offline “toll booths.”
g
The takeaways from this message are important:
  • We are inundated with thousands of marketing messages every day.
  • People are taking diverse paths to find the market for the goods [books] they consume.
  • You are missing the boat if you are not using a diverse strategy to reach them.
  • Your diverse strategy must include BOTH on- and offline components.
  • A deep understanding of relationship marketing is utterly essential.
  • Relationship marketing means the focus is on the prospective buyer, not the campaign.
  • You are not your buyer, even though you wrote the book they will wind up buying.
  • We need new tools to measure the new marketing.

As Marcie said early on, the most important thing is that you get started!

Happy marketing…

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Two things you can do next: (1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it. (2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

The Art of Captivation: What makes us LOVE that book, movie, song…?

You probably have one of your own. That CD or MP3 you’ve listened to 1,000 times. For me, it’s the first 3 songs from U2’s Joshua Tree (Side A for you old-school vinyl enthusiasts). I’m not sure what it is about The Edge’s primal guitar beat that is so captivating, but it is as intoxicating to me as any drink. I hear the intro to “The Streets Have No Name” and I want to climb inside the music. Add an open car window on the freeway at midnight, and I’m in heaven.

Right now, you might be relating, or thinking I have terrible taste in that overblown Irish quartet. The point isn’t that you agree with my taste, but that you can relate to the concept of music you absolutely love.

 

These passionate responses are not exclusive to music. What about that movie you’ve watched dozens of times? The painting that mesmerizes you? The book that’s falling apart, you’ve read it so many times?

What makes them so special? Although there are general success indicators, the answer to that question is personal to each of us.

For example, the music industry has distilled the prediction of hit records (primarily from new artists) down to a science. Ever wondered why so many hits have such a similar sound? It might be related to the fact that music researchers in labs hook up test subjects to electrodes and measure their responses to numbers of beats, rhythms, and tones. The studios then generally take risks only on those artists whose music meets the standards predicted by the research.

Similarly, a guy decided to research what makes an Academy Award-winning movie. He got copies of 25 years’ worth of Oscar winners, watched them, and dissected and recorded the similarities between them. Then, he turned his research into a screenwriting class for which he charges thousands of dollars. Not surprisingly, many of his students sell their scripts and see them made into films.

Even with these behind-the-scenes “manipulations,” not every song the studios release becomes a hit, nor does every screenplay from this man’s class become a movie. They are indicators, though.

One thing I’ve observed about most popular art forms is that they’re usually of decent quality. Of course, every now and then a lousy book or movie finds a cult following, but more often than not, the things we like as a culture are pretty good. However, even the most popular books, movies, and music will never appeal to everyone.

As a personal example, it’s just in the last 15 years that I’ve begun to like the Beatles. And to this day, I’m still not a fan of one of the most popular bands of all time, The Rolling Stones. Both inarguably quality artists, but one appeals to me much more than the other, and even that one took some time to grow on me.

What does all of this have to do with you and marketing your book? A few quick reminders:

  • If you want to sell books, make the best book you can.
  • There are success formulas; one of them may work for you.
  • When it comes right down to it, taste is individual. Some readers will resonate with you; those are the ones you want to find and cultivate.
  • Even if you hit a home run with your book, there will be some people who don’t like it.

Study the movies, music, and books you love; pay attention to what about them captivates you. Are there hints you can glean about developing and capturing a similar passion in your readers?

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Two things you can do next: (1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it. (2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

Read Full Post »

If bookstores were properly categorized…

Oh, how I wish I could take credit for this one! Here is a delightful excerpt from Italo Calvino’s If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler. Book lovers near and far will be able to relate to this!

Sections in the Bookstore

  • Books You Haven’t Read
  • Books You Needn’t Read
  • Books Made for Purposes Other than Reading
  • Books Read Even Before You Open Them, Since They Belong to the Category of Books Read Before Being Written
  • Books That if You Had More than One Life, You Would Certainly Also Read, but Unfortunately Your Days Are Numbered
  • Books You Mean to Read But There Are Others You Must Read First
  • Books Too Expensive Now and You’ll Wait ‘Til They’re Remaindered
  • Books ditto When They Come Out in Paperback
  • Books You Can Borrow from Somebody
  • Books That Everybody’s Read So It’s as if You Had Read Them, Too
  • Books You’ve Been Planning to Read for Ages
  • Books You’ve Been Hunting for Years Without Success
  • Books Dealing with Something You’re Working on at the Moment
  • Books You Want to Own So They’ll Be Handy Just in Case
  • Books You Could Put Aside Maybe to Read This Summer
  • Books You Need to Go with Other Books on Your Shelves
  • Books That Fill You with Sudden, Inexplicable Curiosity, Not Easily Justified
  • Books Read Long Ago Which It’s Now Time to Re-read
  • Books You’ve Always Pretended to Have Read and Now It’s Time to Sit Down and Really Read Them
  • Books You Love but Wouldn’t Be Caught Dead Holding on the Subway**
  • Books You’ve Lent to Someone, but You Can’t Remember Who**
  • Books to Inspire Your Own Writing**

This is a pretty thorough list, but if you have any to add, please do so in the comment section. The double-asterisks (**) are my own additions.

Happy reading er browsing, and then reading!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Two things you can do next: (1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it. (2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

Read Full Post »

Linen Laid & Felt — Utterly GORGEOUS Handmade Books

If you are a bibliophile who loves the physicality of books … their texture, weight, covers, smell, artistry, design … you MUST visit Linen Laid & Felt, a site hosted by handmade book artist, Katie Gonzalez. She describes herself this way:

I’m a cardigan-wearing bookbinder living and working in Nashville, Tennessee with my husband and my dog. I studied the art of bookmaking in Cortona, Italy during the summer of 2006. My work channels traditional techniques into bright, contemporary books that emphasize textures, colors, and patterns. Archival materials make these books — whether journals, photo albums, guest books, or sculptural expressions — into long-lasting works of art. I want to share my works in progress and the photography, sewing, printmaking, and other arts that inspire me.

This site is luscious and rich, even if you’re  not that into the whole bookbinding process. Take a look, and let Katie know if you like her stuff!

Happy page-turning!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Two things you can do next: (1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it. (2) Visit Laura’s other blog, Write| Market | Design.

Read Full Post »

Authors, your readers would love to know what YOU’RE READING! A list of lists…

The other night, I came across a wonderful list of books about dragons. The list maker, obviously a huge fantasy fiction fan, had painstakingly drawn up an extensive list of dragon books, including cover shots. Now I loved the movie Dragonslayer and even thought the lady dragon in Shrek was cute, but I’m not much of a fantasy fiction fan. Nevertheless, I found this list compelling enough to share on my Facebook page.

It also got me to thinking about who creates such a list and what the value might be in doing so. I’ve been subscribed to GoodReads.com almost since its inception, but beyond the first dozen or so books I listed, I’ve never added a title nor paid much attention to it. I suppose I read what I want, whatever strikes my fancy (or need) at the time, but I seldom seem to consult others for ideas.

I worked with a guy a few years back, though, who read only thrillers. Not only that, he read only thrillers by authors he already knew. Seriously. I couldn’t believe someone would be so limited in their reading choices, but the only way this guy would try a new author was if they were strongly recommended by someone he trusted, and even then, he did so with great skepticism.

The fact is, some people just prefer to have someone recommend titles to them, perhaps because it’s easier than staring at the millions of books on Amazon or the gazillion titles in a book store or library and trying to choose one.

I think this can benefit authors, because one thing your readers always want is to know more about you. And what better way to do that than by sharing your own reading list? If you don’t have one, maybe you could compile one around a topic of interest to you.

The dragons list compelled me to look for other lists. Not all are as well done as the dragons, but some are much more exhaustive. Perhaps my list of lists will give you a jumping off point for creating your own list.

Books about NURSES

Books about HERMITS

Books about GRANDMOTHERS

Books about BEEKEEPERS

Books about PIRATES

Books about PLAYWRIGHTS

Books about U.S. PRESIDENTS

Books about DOGS

Books about the CIRCUS

Books about GHOSTS

Books not about, but by SCIENTISTS

Books by DEAD AUTHORS

Writers writing on the topic of WRITING (not necessarily books)

Happy reading and list-making!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

We invite you to do two things next:

(1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it.

(2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

Read Full Post »

There’s NO SUCH THING as a nonfiction novel!

If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you may have come to know my penchant for, “This should go without saying, but…” THIS ONE definitely should go without saying, but there it was, on an indie book review blog:

This blog is for novels (over 50,000 words) by indie writers in any of the following fiction or non-fiction categories:  action / adventure / chick lit / drama / fantasy / historical / horror / mystery / thriller / romance / and science fiction.

Seriously. I’m not making this up. I’m not going to name the blogger here, but if you’re on the Google, you can figure it out with a few key strokes. HOW can someone post that they’re reviewing only novels … and then say they’ll accept books “in any of the following fiction or nonfiction categories”?

Let’s clarify this once and for all.

FICTION: Prose literature, esp. short stories
and novels (i.e., not poetry), about IMAGINARY
events and people.

NONFICTION: Prose writing based on FACTS,
such as biography or history… or science or politics
or music or medicine or publishing or sports or …

Thanks, Wikipedia, for the definitions.

Therefore, a novel can never be either fiction or nonfiction. It is always fiction. Period.

There is a relatively new genre known as Creative Nonfiction (also known as literary or narrative nonfiction) , which is described as writing that uses literary styles and techniques to create factually accurate narratives. It’s still FACTUAL, though, so it’s still NONfiction; however, it uses literary devices often found in novels and other fictional writing.

On the other hand, some novels are based on real-life incidents; historical fiction is one such genre. You may have seen TV crime dramas based on true stories and real characters; they are fictionalized versions of the stories on which they are based. One would never confuse an episode of Law and Order (fiction) with an episode of Cops (nonfiction). Fiction can contain real characters set in actual places the distinction is that the story is make-believe.

Are these the thing that are confusing people? I wish I knew. And I wish our indie book review blogger was the only person ever to make this blunder, but she’s not. Lots of people you’d think should know better have done the same. You, on the other hand, have NO more excuses.

Here’s to happy fiction and nonfiction writing!

Laura

P.S. The word “nonfiction” is not hyphenated. That’s another mistake you often see.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

We invite you to do two things next:

(1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it.

(2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

Read Full Post »

Do you remember when your love of reading was born?

EVERY day, I post two writing/book/literary quotes on Facebook: one on my personal page and one on my business page. After a while, as interesting as they are, they sometimes begin  to run together. This one stood out for me, perhaps because I was instantly transported back to that moment when my life was changed forever.

At one magical instant in your early childhood, the page of a book – that string of confused, alien ciphers – shivered into meaning. Words spoke to you, gave up their secrets; at that moment, whole universes opened. You became, irrevocably, a reader.

_Alberto Manguel_

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Two things you can do next: (1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it. (2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: