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Posts Tagged ‘blog keywords’

Blog keyword selection: Good for rankings, research, and connections

Last week, we did a post that discussed the importance of tags, or keywords, for your blog posts. I want to explore keywords a little more closely today.

Choosing the proper keywords is essential to the success of your blog because it determines where your posts will show up in the search rankings. You want to pay attention to a few things when determining your keywords:

RELEVANCE – Make sure your keywords pertain to the topics for which you want Internet searchers to find you.

TRAFFIC – Deeper than searching, this means that once people find your link, they click on it.

COMPETITION – How many other people are using the same keywords and how well are they doing with them?

PROFITABILITY – If your goal is to enhance your book sales, you want your keywords to attract buyers, not just researchers.

You can use various keyword tools like Wordtracker, Google Adwords Keyword Tool, KeywordSpy, or Good Keywords to help determine the best keywords for your blog posts. These tools will take a word, say “vacation,” and give you the most popular variations of searches people do for that word or phrase, like vacation sweepstakes, Napa Valley vacations, Italian vacations, dog-friendly vacations, and cooking vacations, along with the number of monthly searches associated with each term. Most of the tools are fee-based but allow a free trial.

But there is another way you can use keywords. My WordPress blog tracks the terms people are using to find me.

So occasionally, I will do my own search for the same terms to see who else is writing about them.

This usually leads to a couple of things. This particular search is where I came across a treat post titled 8 Interesting Guerrilla Marketing Campaigns, which I mentioned in the comment section on my post on guerrilla/mischief marketing.

By visiting the blogs/websites that are addressing the same topics, I can:

  • Do further research on those topics
  • Find other bloggers to read and comment on, perhaps creating more new relationships
  • Stay current on those topics

Remember, blogging is definitely a place to share your knowledge, promote your book, and build your brand. But it’s also the perfect opportunity to encourage the SOCIAL aspect of social media by interacting with your readers and going out to find other bloggers with whom you can connect. Proper keyword strategies open the door to these possibilities.

Happy keywording!

MARCIE

RESOURCES:

http://sonnylanorias.com/keyword-research-tool-online-business/

http://www.steps-to-make-your-own-website.com/what-are-keywords.html

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Download your complimentary copy of the highly useful Website Design & Marketing worksheet from Write | Market | Design.

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

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If you don’t know, ASK! A couple blog explanations that might seem obvious, but are not necessarily crystal clear to new bloggers

“If you don’t know, ask! There are no stupid questions.” This was a refrain I heard from my father all my growing up years. Perhaps it’s why I was never afraid to ask questions of teachers, professors, bosses, or trainers. In fact, I developed a knack for assessing others’ struggles to ask or articulate their questions, frequently asking a question I knew the answer to just for the sake of the others in the room.

I’ll never forget one instructor who was not terribly proficient at her subject matter bumbling through an explanation to the point where she seemed to have lost virtually the whole room. So I raised my hand like a good Catholic schoolgirl, and asked, “So are you saying…?”rephrasing what I thought she was trying to convey. She was so annoyed that she pointedly answered my question, finally clarifying her point, but speaking loudly and slowly and directly to me as if I were the idiot.

Even though there really are no stupid questions, sometimes we forget how much we know or how easy what we do is for us, so we can skip steps or fail to adequately explain the entirety of a process. This came to light for me recently when a friend who’s moving her website to the WordPress platform asked me, “So what’s the difference between categories and tags?”

I realized, as I tried to answer her, that it’s not as obvious as one might think. Categories are the broad topics or headings under which your posts fall. In my case, I’ve got them broken down into 9 categories. You only see 8 of them on the list to the right because one category, Guest Posts, has no posts associated with it yet. (Hint: You’re highly encouraged to submit a guest post!)

Tags, on the other hand, are the keywords associated with each post. While the insertion of tags and placement of posts into categories is not automatic, it’s easy enough on most platforms, as they have mechanisms that allow you to select tags and categories for each post. In the tag cloud for the Marcie Brock blog, the terms that are used the most often are larger; lesser used terms appear in a smaller font.

If tags and categories are something you’ve been ignoring or overlooking, please make them a priority! Proper tagging and categorizing can make all the difference in how well ranked your posts are in the search engines.

One other often overlooked piece of your blog setup is the facility for building pages. Similar to a regular (nonblog) website, you can add pages to your site. While you can add or change content as frequently as you like, the pages are static and remain fixed – usually with the names indicated across the top of your blog header. Most of the free blogging platforms will allow you to build up to 10 pages. At the very least, you should have an About page that includes your bio, purchasing details for your book, and contact info. Depending on your platform, you may be able to turn one of those pages into a virtual bookstore and sell your books from your blog. The free WordPress.com platform does not allow for this – but Blogger does, as does a stand-alone WordPress.org blog.

In coming posts, we’ll talk in further detail about the kinds of things you might want to include on your sidebar(s), as well as how to choose a template that works best for your needs.

In the meantime, happy tagging!

MARCIE

__________________

Download your complimentary copy of the highly useful Website Design & Marketing worksheet from Write | Market | Design.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

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