Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Bibliophilia’ Category

15 Books about Fireworks to Celebrate Independence Day

 

Thinking about naming your new patriotic book Fireworks? I wouldn’t if I were you – not if your goal is to be original. In my Amazon search tonight for fireworks, 3,320 titles came up. The following are a selection of these titles. Please understand, I am not endorsing them, as I have never read any of them. I chose them based on covers I liked, titles that intrigued me, and just plain ol’ strangeness. The descriptions are direct quotes from their Amazon write-ups or published reviews. Think some of them may be telling about the quality?


 

1Fireworks, by George Plimpton. I first read this book while sitting in the office of our fireworks shop in NJ. I got about 12 pages in and realized that Mr. Plimpton knew the fellow I was working for. When I questioned my boss about this, he said ‘George? Hell, he used to come down and shoot with us – he loves fireworks’. Unfortunately he had passed on before I read the book, it would have been interesting to shoot a show with him. However the stories and information in the book show how taken he was with the craft of fireworks. For the casual fireworks fan, or for the dedicated pyrotechnician, you will find this book most enjoyable. 


2Fireworks Fiasco: A Very Smell 4th of July, by PJ Ryan. Rebekah, RJ and Mouse are very excited because they are all going to celebrate the Fourth of July together. There will be great food, a pet parade and a fireworks display that’s about to get VERY interesting after they put there heads together to come up with a magnificent prank that is sure to surprise everyone.

 

 


3Fireworks, by RaeAnne Thayne. Rachel Lawrence hasn’t been back to Wyoming since her husband died fighting a brush fire, but if seeing her beloved nephews again means facing rancher Sam Wyatt and the guilt she still feels, she’s willing to take the risk. Sam has plenty of his own guilt. He walked away from fighting fires and built a comfortable life on the ranch for him and his sons in Whiskey Creek. The last thing he needs is for Rachel to come back with her green eyes, her long legs and the smile he’s never been able to forget. 

 


4Fireworks over Toccoa, by Jeffrey Stepakoff. An unexpected discovery takes 84-year-old Lily Davis Woodward to 1945, and the five days that forever changed her life. Married for only a week before her husband was sent to fight in WWII, Lily is anxious for his return, and the chance to begin their life together. In honor of the soldiers’ homecoming, the small Georgia town of Toccoa plans a big celebration. And Jake Russo, a handsome Italian immigrant, also back from war, is responsible for the elaborate fireworks display the town commissioned.

 

 


5Destiny Center Success Journal – Fireworks, by Diane Wigstone. Congratulations on taking your next step towards a new you! Your purchase of this Journal means that you are serious about making some changes in your life and becoming all that God created you to be! [NO idea what the fireworks have to do with your success or God…] 

 

 


6Quackers and the Fireworks, by Candace Hughes. This sweet little duck is back for adventure! This time around he celebrates the 4th of July with his best buddy Nickolas. Nickolas helps Quackers with his fear of fireworks so they can both enjoy the celebration together. [Wondering, just a little, why the namesake duck doesn’t seem to make an appearance on the cover…] 

 


7The Firework-Maker’s Daughter, by Philip Pullman. Lila dreams to become a firework-maker, just like her father. In order to become a true firework-maker, she sets off alone on a perilous journey to reach the terrifying Fire-Fiend. She travels through jungles alive with crocodiles, snakes, monkeys and pirates, and climbs up the scolding volcano. 

 


8Faith, Fireworks and Fir, by Pam Andrews Hanson. David Maxwell is on a mission. He’s come to Evergreen, Michigan to persuade his beloved elderly aunts, Carrie and Cora, to give up their bed and breakfast and retire to Phoenix to be closer to him. His aunts have no intention of retiring and enlist Faith Turner, who manages a year-round Christmas store, to persuade their nephew to change his mind. 

 


9Fireworks on the 4th, by CR Hiatt. WARNING: The exploits of the sleuthing duo of McSwain & Beck are not fanciful fairy tales, or made for TV love stories. Though the series is fiction, the crimes depicted are straight from the headline-type stories, developed from interviews with big city and small town detectives. The situations are real. Ruthless corruption is real, and the perpetrators and victims are getting younger. 

 


10Fireworks: Nine Profane Pieces, by Angela Carter. In Fireworks, Angela Carter manages to tell stories dealing with Japan, medieval torture tactics, incest, gender-bending, and mirrors (LOTS of mirrors). 

 

 

 


11Selling Fireworks for Profit! “I Made Over $40,000 in 16 Days,” by Will West. [Sure you did.] If you’ve ever wondered about Selling Fireworks for yourself, your business or a non-profit group or charity, this books is an introduction to the business and the best way to make money selling fireworks. You’ll learn about the business and what it takes to sell fireworks.

 

 

 


12Fireworks and Darkness, by Natalie Jane Prior. The temperature in the room dropped, like the bitter cold before a storm, and the smell of magic gathered like a mist. Then the windows rattled, the floor shook and the paper stars and firework cases and all the trumpery tackle of Casimir’s trade suddenly lifted off the shelves and whirled around him in a blinding, stinging storm… Simeon Runciman is a firework maker who used to be a dark magician; a difficult man with a dangerous past. His son, Casimir, has always known part of the truth about him. 

 


13Fireworks at Dusk: Paris in the Thirties, by Olivier Bernier, portrait of Paris during the 1930s. Among the characters featured are some of the best-known names of the period – artists, writers, designers, party-givers and political figures, including Elsa Maxwell, Picasso, Dali, Gide, Cocteau, Schiaparelli and Pierre Laval. 

 

 


14Summer, Fireworks, and My Corpse, by Otsuichi. Summer is a simple story of a nine-year-old girl who dies while on summer vacation. While her youthful killers try to hide the her body, she tells us the story – from the POV of her dead body – of the boys’ attempt to get away murder.  

 

 


15Katy Perry: A Life of Fireworks, by Chloe Govan. How Katy made her transformation from demure choir girl to sexy household name. Accounts of the conflict Katy had growing up with a deeply religious minister as a father and her penchant for skimpy attention-grabbing outfits and subversive lyrics. Details the story of her ill-fated early career, including an early gospel album released by a small record company which went bankrupt soon afterward. Her eventual rise to fame and her controversial first chart-topping single “I Kissed A Girl,” her bisexual affair and the struggle Katy faced between her sexuality and her religious background. Exclusive stories revealing the making of her albums. Tales of the love affair and marriage to notorious television presenter Russell Brand.

Wishing all of Marcie’s American readers a happy, fireworky 4th!

Laura

__________________ Summer Author Event PHOENIX-AREA AUTHORS: If you or someone you know is an author in Phoenix, please consider participating in the Summer Author Event on August 16. This multi-author book signing and meet-and-greet will put you in front of hundreds of readers in a casual environment where you can sell and sign books. There are three levels of participation. The first 100 attendees will receive goody bags – and for just $25, you can put a promo for your book into the goody bags!  Learn more or register at SummerAuthorEvent.com.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

 

 

Read Full Post »

A variety of GORGEOUS handmade books

One of the most popular posts we ever wrote was about how to create a zine – an 8-page booklet created out of a single letter-size sheet of paper. They are certainly fun to make, and quite easy. And they are a simplistic version of a handmade book.500 Handmade Books volume 2

The images below come from a book by Lark Crafts that contains creative, sophisticated, intricate, and interesting handmade books of all shapes and sizes. The books, juried by Julie Chen, are among the 500 books in the aptly titled 500 Handmade Books, Volume 2.

This is the description of 500 Handmade Books, Volume 1, from the Lark website:

Interest in bookbinding and the related arts has exploded in the past decade, inspiring artists to explore the unlimited possibilities of the form – and delighting collectors, crafters, and gallery owners. [T]his collection is a provocative on-the-page-gallery of show-stopping artistry from finely tooled leather covers to books with mysterious accordion folds.

I’m thinking I want to try one or two of these – particularly the ones that lend themselves to the use of postcards – as collector book perks for my forthcoming PubSlush campaign for Stan Finds Himself on the Other Side of the World.

I love the multimedia aspect of these books, the dimensionality, the texture, the colors. OK – I’m not a big fan of smoking, but the concept is clever. And the love interest in Stan is an artist, so I love the watercolor tray idea!

I hope you enjoy these as much as I did. And keep in  mind, this is just a taste of the 15 I really liked. there are 485 others in this book, and 500 more in the first book, so check them out!

p. 18

p. 18

500 Handmade Books volume 2

p. 79

500 Handmade Books volume 2

p. 88

500 Handmade Books volume 2

p. 137

500 Handmade Books volume 2

p. 156

500 Handmade Books volume 2

p. 173

500 Handmade Books volume 2

p. 219

500 Handmade Books, volume 2

p. 223

500 Handmade Books, volume 2

p. 237

500 Handmade Books, volume 2

p. 240

500 Handmade Books, volume 2

p. 245

500 Handmade Books, volume 2

p. 268

500 Handmade Books, volume 2

p. 373

500 Handmade Books, volume 2

p. 67

 

 

500 Handmade Books, volume 2

p. 55

 

If you have handmade books you’d like to share, please put the links in the comments below.

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below."Practical Philanthropy" book cover

__________________

Check out Laura’s newest book, Practical Philanthropy: How ‘Giving Back’ Helps You, Your Business, and the World Around You. A percentage of all book sales is donated to Art4TheHomeless.org and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.

Read Full Post »

A massive wake up call… 493 million women worldwide cannot read this headline

For someone whose chosen career is to help authors publish meaningful books and connect those books with the readers they will benefit, I am, perhaps surprisingly, a fairly light reader. I love to read; I just haven’t done very much of it lately. Let me clarify – I haven’t read many books lately. I have a Kindle Fire with nearly 100 ebooks on it, but I use it mostly to check email and read articles and blog posts. My husband and I own hundreds of books – and I still buy them frequently enough. But sometime over the last few years, I’ve gotten out of the habit of making dedicated time to read books.

illiteracy

Until one Sunday about two months ago, when my husband and I decided to go to the library and explore. Since then, I’ve been reading more. But I still hadn’t committed to reading one book all the way through. I’m a reader who always has multiple books going at one time. One in my bag, one in the car, one by my bed, one in the bathroom (yes, the bathroom). Until my last visit to the library, when I picked up a brand new paperback copy of the 1996 novel Pope Joan, by Donna Woolfolk Cross.

This book captivated me from the first page. I’m now 143 pages into a book that truly lives up to that frequently-bandied-but-seldom-true description: page turner. It is the fictional account of the 9th century woman who disguised herself as a man and rose to become the only female to sit on the papal throne. Of course, detractors say her existence is mere myth – but whether she was an actual person or not has absolutely no bearing on this fantastic story.

The initial part of the story deals with Joan’s desire to become educated at a time when women were considered “by nature, quite incapable of reasoning.” … “Their natural humors, which are cold and moist, are unpropitious for cerebral activity. They cannot comprehend the higher spiritual and moral concepts.” (Pope Joan, p. 82)

So here’s this impactful story about a 9th century girl who bucks trends and odds to become educated when even most men could neither read nor write. She read not one, but at least three languages. And while her struggles were a  moving part of the story for me, they were simply plot points. Until, this morning, when I found myself pausing in amazement, yet again, that this story was devised from 26 characters that its author has turned into words that paint such vivid pictures that I can imagine the scenes as if I were watching a movie.

And then it hit me – what an utter misfortune it is for those who cannot read a book for pleasure. And then, of course, the next natural conclusion finally struck me: What about those who cannot read, period?

I set the book down and jumped online to do some basic research, and the statistics are amazing!

  • Approximately 14 percent – or 32 million – U.S. adults are unable to read.
  • In the U.S., two-thirds of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of fourth grade will end up in jail or on welfare.
  • One in four American children grow up without learning how to read.
  • Literacy is a learned skill. Illiteracy is passed down from parents who can neither read nor write.
  • As of 2011, the U.S. Was the only free-market OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) country where the current generation was less  educated than the previous one.
  • Nearly 85 percent of youths who face trial in the American juvenile court system are functionally illiterate.
  • More than 70 percent of America’s prison population cannot read above a fourth grade level.
  • Of Americans who receive food stamps, 75 percent perform in the lowest two levels of literacy, and 90 percent of high school dropouts are on welfare.
  • Teenage girls ages 16 to 19 with below-average literacy skills are six times more likely to get pregnant than girls their age who can read proficiently.
  • Reports show that low literacy directly costs the healthcare industry more than $70 million every year.
  • Long Beach, California has been ranked the country’s most illiterate city, followed by Mesa, Arizona (neighbor to my home city of Phoenix), and Aurora, Colorado.
  • Worldwide, 774 million people are unable to read – 66 percent of them (or 493 million) are women.

I don’t know about you, but I’m inspired to do something about this. ProLiteracy is one place to begin. Or you can do a search for Literacy Volunteers in your area.

Definitely more on this to come – maybe even my next book. A bit ironic, isn’t it?

Laura

RESOURCES

https://beta.dosomething.org/facts/11-facts-about-literacy-america

http://www.statisticbrain.com/number-of-american-adults-who-cant-read

http://www.proliteracy.org/the-crisis/overview

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below."Practical Philanthropy" book cover

__________________

Check out Laura’s newest book, Practical Philanthropy: How ‘Giving Back’ Helps You, Your Business, and the World Around You. A percentage of all book sales is donated to Art4TheHomeless.org and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul.

Read Full Post »

14 reasons I love books…

What better time to celebrate our love for books than Valentine’s Day?

Here’s a collection of gorgeous book images, with a little about how I came to be a book person, why I read, what I read, and how I read. Please share your own similar stories in the Comments section below.

Book-Love 10

I taught myself to read at about age 4 because I wanted to be able to read the comics in the Sunday paper to myself. I had my dad read me the same Golden Books again and again so I could memorize the words.

__________________________________

Book-Love 3

I was in second grade when my dad took me to the library for my first “research project” on the Great White Shark. He taught me how to use the card catalogue so I could find my own way around the library later. It worked. I seldom needed help again.

__________________________________

Book-Love 1

My favorite thing about elementary school was the chance to order new books through the Scholastic Book Club leaflet. The longest days of the school year were the days between handing in my form with my dad’s check, and the day that magical brown box showed up on the teacher’s desk so she could distribute our books.

__________________________________

Book-Love 2

Summers were spent reading 40, 50, as many as 100 books as part of the library’s Summer Reading Program. Encyclopedia Brown. Nancy Drew. Madeleine L’Engle. Laura Ingalls Wilder. I read them all…

“You have to write the book that wants to be written.
And if the book will be too difficult for grown-ups,
then you write it for children.”
– Madeleine L’Engle

__________________________________

Book-Love 6

I met my best friend in a summer program at ASU between eighth grade and our freshman year in high school. The classes we took together included an etymology class and a sentence-combining seminar. My writing improved vastly that summer! I went from an average of 6 words per sentence to an average of 21 words per sentence. Thirty-some years later, I still find the information and processes I learned in those classes helpful.

Jane lived in a small Southern Arizona town; I lived in Phoenix. This was before the Internet. So we wrote letters – the old-fashioned kind with ink and paper. Jane’s letters were long, funny missives in purple ink, most of which I still have.

__________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When I began at the University of Arizona, each freshman was required to take a Library Skills course. Again, this was pre-Internet. The course was supposed to take up to 21 hours to complete. I did mine inside of 3 hours – and I remember being very grateful to my dad at the time.

__________________________________

Book-Love 5

I’m not a person who can read just one book at a time. At any given moment, I’ve got a book in the bathroom, one in my shoulder bag, and at least one on my nightstand. That doesn’t even take into account the Kindle.

__________________________________

Book-Love 7

I read all kinds of things – fiction and nonfiction. Love stories, historical novels, literary fiction. Spiritual books, marketing and business books, political books, personal growth books. Our reading taste is one place my husband and I diverge. He reads music biographies and autobiographies, as well as horror/thrillers from Stephen King, Dean Koontz, and the like.

__________________________________

Book-Love 8

Did anyone ever finish The Thorn Birds? When I read it, I got within about 50 pages of the end of Colleen McCollough’s 692-page tome before simply losing interest. I didn’t intend to abandon the book; it just happened. But then I began asking all my friends who’d read it/were reading it, and no one finished the thing. The first book I ever quit on purpose was Pat Conroy’s Beach Music. Having really enjoyed Prince of Tides, I had high expectations for this book. It was boring and tedious from the start. I kept thinking it would get better, but by page 120, I knew that wasn’t going to happen. It was a big deal to give myself permission to quit reading a book. So glad I finally got over that issue.

__________________________________

Book-Love 13

I love libraries and bookstores because I love the touch and feel of books. I love knowing that people spent hours researching and writing them. I love the thought that I might be one of hundreds of people to read a single library book. I love the concept of BookCrossing.

It’s really astonishing to think that all our communication, all the English-language books and letters, are derived from 26 little symbols:
a – b – c – d – e – f – g – h – i – j – k – l – m – n – o – p – q – r – s – t – u – v – w – x – y -z.

__________________________________

Book-Love 9

I love that books can take us places, create visions, share knowledge, engage ideas – in short, call us to a higher purpose. Certainly not every book serves those roles, but they are, to be sure, the books toward which I gravitate. And in my work with self-publishing authors, my goal is to work with socially conscious authors and would-be authors.

__________________________________

Book-Love 11

Chick lit is my guilty pleasure – along with romantic comedies, when it comes to movies. But good stories with well-drawn characters. Remember, I’m not afraid to drop a book like a hot tamale if it’s not worthy of my time. I bought 50 Shades of Grey out of curiosity. Didn’t make it past the first gawdawful chapter. One massively underrated book is Helen Fielding’s (Bridget Jones) first novel, Cause Celeb.

__________________________________

Book-Love 12

This weekend my sister, husband, and I will attend the 58th annual VNSA Book Sale in Phoenix, where we’ll surely by a couple dozen more books. We had a yard sale in the fall which allowed us to clear out space in our floor-to-ceiling bookcases, so now there’s at least a little room for the newcomers!

__________________________________

Book-Love 14

While I fully appreciate the ease, necessity, practicality, and inevitability of ebooks, printed books will always be first, and forever, in my heart.

Happy Valentine’s Day to the readers, writers, authors, and book lovers among us!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Want a professional book cover that doesn’t cost you an arm and a leg? Visit our website to Template 5peruse our selection of 25 book cover templates, and download our complimentary special report, “Book Elements:

Read Full Post »

Amazon has hit a new low in punishing successful authors

I first learned of this story from Ruth Ann Nordin at Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors.

Then I read the first-hand account from Jamie McGuire about her situation with Amazon.

The capsule version is that Jamie McGuire was successful enough with her book, Beautiful Disaster, that a publisher picked it up. Now, Amazon is offering to issue everyone who originally bought the self-published version from them a refund PLUS the $7 difference in price for the new version with the publisher (seemingly to punish McGuire from bailing on Amazon), but Amazon is debiting McGuire’s account to pay the refunds.

Please read McGuire’s full first-hand account to be sure you understand all the nuances and details.

I have long defended Amazon when other authors were railing against them for one thing or another, but this is simply EVIL! If McGuire’s account is true and accurate (and I have no reason to believe it’s not), we absolutely must band together to support each other so that this WRONGwrongWRONG practice does not gain momentum or support.

stop amazon

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________Microsoft PowerPoint - Create a Fan Page 2013 ebook

Need help creating – or updating – your Facebook Fan Page? At nearly 200 pages, this eBook is chock-full of screen shots and details about how to create or improve your Facebook Fan Page. Includes details about adding a MY BOOKS feature to your page. Grow your Fan Page and grow your list of potential readers! Get Using Facebook Fan Pages to Market Your Book and/or Build Your Business today!

Read Full Post »

Green publishing and book recycling: Steps in the right direction

For those of us with a concern for the planet, one of the best things to come from the move toward eBooks is the reduction of paper consumption, and therefore the wholesale harvesting of trees. For Earth Day, I thought we might examine some important numbers related to the ways the publishing industry affects the planet – and then look at some ideas for recycling your old books.

Trees that would be saved if the book industry shifted to a collective
average of 30 percent post-consumer (i.e., recycled) paper.
__________________________

Publishers, printers, and mills that have developed strong
environmental policies, and/or signed the
Book Industry Treatise on Responsible Paper Use.

__________________________

Pounds of greenhouse gas emissions prevented
by replacing one ton of virgin fiber with one ton
of post-consumer recycled fiber.

__________________________

Rank of the pulp and paper industry on the list
of largest industrial greenhouse emitters.

__________________________

Kinds of new book paper with environmental
attributes that have been developed recently.

__________________________

Wood harvest committed to industrial use
(i.e., everything except fuel wood) that goes
into paper production.

__________________________

Amount of solid landfill waste that is paper.

__________________________

These numbers are a bit dated, as they come from a 2007 post from TreeHuggers.org titled “How to Go Green for Publishers; however, they still tell a shocking story about the effects of traditional print book publishing on our forests and land.

Please make a point of reading the full post for other fantastic information, like:

Top Green Book Publishing Tips

Green Book Publishing: Getting Techie

Where to Get Green Book Publishing Materials

Green Book Publishing: From the Archives

Further Reading on Green Book Publishing

In addition to being planet-conscious with your publishing, you can also help Mother Earth by recycling your old books. If you’ve amassed a large library and it’s time to downsize or you need to make room for new titles, here are a few ways you can recycle your old books.

  • Resell them at a local used book store.
  • Sell specialty books on eBay or Amazon – it may be too much effort and too little reward for run-of-the-mill titles.
  • Host a book swap party – or find a book exchange on Meetup.com.
  • Donate them to your local library.
  • Donate children’s books (toddler to age 18) to foster homes and programs for at-risk youth.
  • Post them on freecycle.com – since you’ve got to give something away before you accept any items.
  • Donate them to Goodwill or other second-hand store.
  • Donate them to a nursing home, hospice or hospital – even if they’re not large print, the staff and visitors would welcome new reading material.
  • Donate them to a prison library – especially textbooks and nonfiction educational books.
  • Leave a book on a train, in a waiting room, or some other public place – a potential found treasure. Tag your book with a unique code and use Bookcrossing.com to track who finds your book.

We have one home, so it’s up to each of us to do our part to protect her. If you have other ideas about green publishing or ways to recycle old books, please share them in the “Comments” section below.

Happy recycling!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

Read Full Post »

Why did the writer cross the road?

Because she was driven.

Yes, today we’re going to lighten things up a bit with some literary humor. I strove for variety and, of course, things that made me chuckle. Please feel free to share your own writing jokes below in the COMMENTS section.

Enjoy!

___________________________

A linguistics professor was lecturing to his English class one day. “In English,” he said, “a double negative forms a positive. In some languages, though, such as Russian, a double negative is still a negative. However, there is no language wherein a double positive can form a negative.”

A voice from the back of the room piped up, “Yeah, right.”

A writer died and was given the option of going to heaven or hell and decided to check out each place first. As she descended into the fiery pits, she saw row upon row of writers chained to their desks in a steaming sweatshop. As they worked, they were repeatedly whipped with thorny lashes.

“Oh my,” said the writer. “Let me see heaven now.”

A few moments later, she ascended into heaven and saw rows of writers, chained to their desks in a steaming sweatshop. As they worked, they, too, were whipped with thorny lashes.

“Wait a minute,” said the writer. “This is just as bad as hell!”

“Oh no, it’s not,” replied an unseen voice. “Here, your work gets published.”

How many screenwriters does it take to screw in a light bulb?

Why does it *have* to be changed?

Punctuation Parable

Dear Rhet,

I want a man who knows what love is all about. You are generous, kind, thoughtful. People who are not like you admit to being useless and inferior.
You have ruined me for other men. I yearn for you. I have no feelings whatsoever when we’re apart. I can be forever happy – will you let me be yours?

Scarlett

**********

Dear Mr. Darcy,

I want a man who knows what love is. All about you are generous, kind, thoughtful people, who are not like you. Admit to being useless and inferior.
You have ruined me. For other men, I yearn. For you, I have no feelings whatsoever. When we’re apart, I can be forever happy. Will you let me be?

Yours,

Elizabeth

Charles Dickens: Please, sir, I’d like a martini.

Bartender: Sure thing. Olive or twist?

Make some time to laugh every day! It unleashes the creativity and helps you feel wonderful! Oh, and it burns lots of calories, too!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: