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Archive for February, 2012

Interesting marketing (read, social media) stats authors might find useful

If you’re a metrics junkie, you love numbers and stats. If you’re a book marketer, though you might find statistics boring, they are immensely useful in understanding where your market is and how they want to be touched. The following are some of the more interesting (OK, interesting to me) statistics from a couple recent publications.

NOTE: The following statistics are borrowed from two sources:

HubSpot’s 100 Awesome Marketing Stats, Charts, & Graphs and AdAge’s Book of Tens: Stats That Mattered for Media and Marketing in 2011.  Each cited its own sources in the original material — I have not reproduced those original citations in the following images.

http://adage.com/article/adagestat/stats-mattered-media-marketing-2011/231534/
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http://adage.com/article/adagestat/stats-mattered-media-marketing-2011/231534/
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/14416/100-Awesome-Marketing-Stats-Charts-Graphs-Data.aspx
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http://adage.com/article/adagestat/stats-mattered-media-marketing-2011/231534/
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http://adage.com/article/adagestat/stats-mattered-media-marketing-2011/231534/
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OK, that last one is probably more voyeuristic than useful, but you know who you are!

Even if none of these specific statistics speaks to you or your audience, you might want to think about going out to find stats that do apply in your situation. Who are your readers? Where are they? How much have they integrated social media into their lives? Where should you be if you want to connect with them?

Happy researching!

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

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Like all tools, social media can backfire

Social media is indeed a fantastic tool for authors, but as with all tools, there are dangers. I am sure that as SBMs* you are way too smart to ever make any of these errors. Nevertheless, anytime I find myself thinkng, “It should go without saying,” I know the lesson most certainly bears repeating. Remember the first rule of social media? The SOCIAL part. Well, some folks seem to forget: errors are made by big companies, individuals, publications – almost all types of users have had their challenges. Read on and learn these lessons well.

USE YOUR COMMON SENSE. First off is a host of errors compiled from 2011. The headline on this should say “Twitter Fails,” as all are incidents in some way related to the microblogging site, but they are good reminders of what NOT to do. From extremely high-profile incidents like Anthony Weiner’s sex scandal to an F-bomb insult that cost New Media Strategies their contract with Chrysler, these are some of the higher-profile incidents from last year.

GET INVOLVED BEFORE THE DAMAGE IS DONE. From smaller companies like Paperchase to behemoths like BP, another mistake participants have made in the social media realm is waiting too long to get involved. Says SocialMediaInfluence.com about a plagiarism incident involving the upscale greeting card retailer: “Paperchase is learning a hard lesson: brands ignore Twitter at their peril. Paperchase is engaging with this community only now, just as a crisis arises.” BP suffered a far worse fate when a wise guy co-opted the Twitter handle @BPGlobalPR. Tongue-in-cheek commentary still rains from this microblogger – truly the last kind of “PR” the oil company could hope for.

OWN UP TO YOUR MISTAKES. In other plagiarism news, TampaBaySocialMedia.com details the wicked response from Cooks Source, a free advertising-supported publication distributed in New England, when they were accused of stealing content from a blogger:

A series of events came to a head concerning Monica Gaudio, a blogger and writer, discovering that an article she had written had been copied wholesale and reprinted in an edition of Cooks Source without her permission. During email conversation with the editor, Judith Griggs, she requested compensation for the copyright violation in the form of an apology (printed and via Facebook) and a $130 donation to the Columbia School of Journalism (roughly $.10/word). Ms. Gaudio, astonished at the reply she received to this request, printed Ms. Griggs’ response on her livejournal:

But honestly Monica, the web is considered “public domain” and you should be happy we just didn’t “lift” your whole article and put someone else’s name on it! It happens a lot, clearly more than you are aware of, especially on college campuses, and the workplace. If you took offence and are unhappy, I am sorry, but you as a professional should know that the article we used written by you was in very bad need of editing, and is much better now than was originally. Now it will work well for your portfolio. For that reason, I have a bit of a difficult time with your requests for monetary gain, albeit for such a fine (and very wealthy!) institution. We put some time into rewrites, you should compensate me! I never charge young writers for advice or rewriting poorly written pieces, and have many who write for me… ALWAYS for free! (excerpted)

Needless to say, DON’T steal other people’s stuff. Secondarily, if you screw up, own it. Trust me, I know how difficult this can be – and it’s only made more so on a ginormous public forum like the World Wide Web. But digging in and justifying your bad behavior is never, ever the answer.

LET BAD REVIEWS LIE. A couple years ago, there was the case of the Scottsdale pizza proprietress and her online war of words with a diner who wrote a less-than-flattering review of her establishment. From a MyFoxPhoenix.com story about the incident:

Among the comments from Joel T’s review about Amy’s pizza: “I took a bite and was immediately underwhelmed.” … “After two small pieces I decided I was wasting my calories and just gave up on it.”

“These people are internet bullies they have nothing to do but sit behind their computer and lie and try to hurt people,” says Amy.

“It was really strange that they chose to lash out at me,” says Joel.

And lash out, Amy did. Writing in response as Amy B. on Yelp she said, “Dear Joel T. it is blatantly obvious to me why you were alone on a Saturday night” and “the pizza was fresh and amazing.”

“If he has freedom of speech so do I!” Amy defends.

“I was just kind of shocked that someone would attack me personally,” says Joel.

The fusillade of internet crossfire between the two triggered a Yelp war from those supporting Amy – and those backing Joel.

It went on for months.

I’m not sure whether the episode harmed Amy’s Baking Company, but it sure did make her look like an idiot. This is just my opinion – but reviewers are entitled to theirs. She might have thought the pizza was amazing, but for whatever reason, Joel did not agree. It’s unreasonable to believe that everyone’s going to like her pizza – just as it is unlikely that everyone will like your book. Even the best books receive 1-star reviews on Amazon. Some are from cranks, of course, and others are from those who simply hold another point of view. If most of your reviews are positive, let the negative ones go. If the majority of your reviews are negative, it could seriously indicate some room for improvement.

DON’T WRITE/POST FAKE REVIEWS. Evidently, bad reviews don’t originate only with dissatisfied customers. This incident is a bit older (five years ago – eons in the lifetime of social media). MediaPost.com details the story of the CEO of Whole Foods who was discovered anonymously posting fake bad reviews of his competition. Really, John Mackey? Need we say more? Don’t write fake reviews! In a related move, the FCC passed a law several years ago requiring those who use online testimonials (a form of review) to notify site visitors when reviewers had been in any way compensated for the review. This means that if you give a free book to a reviewer – they must mention that fact in the review.

DON’T INSINUATE YOURSELF INTO A MEDIUM THAT’S NOT FOR YOU. The University of Orgeon’s Strategic Social Media shares the story of retail magnate Walmart’s attempt to crash the Facebook party back in 2007. Part of the reason for their failure had to do with poor planning. Other problems included trying to be something they weren’t (mimicking their rival, Target) and trying to force themselves onto a platform that didn’t suit them. This could be a valuable lesson for you. Just because one author sees significant success with a particular social media channel does not ensure that you will see the same results. As we’ve mentioned previously, find the one(s) that work for you. Don’t try to be all things to all people.

GIVE YOUR FOLLOWERS WHAT THEY WANT. I’ll wind up with another catchall story by HypeBot.com about five social media fails by musicians. Though I don’t necessarily agree across the board, I do like their opening remarks:

Artists have myriad possibilities when it comes to social networking. The way these are utilized is often woefully misguided, and as a result artists become their own worst enemy.

Musicians often fail to realize that potential fans are not interested in what your music means to you; they are only interested in what your music means to them. Similarly this approach should be taken with you status updates. You need to ask yourself, “Why would anyone care about what I am about to say?” Just because you want the world to know doesn’t mean the world actually wants to know.

HypeBot’s list of musicians’ social media fails:

  1. Putting too much focus on Twitter
  2. The lame question
  3. ME, ME, ME
  4. The overly positive 
  5. Posting quotes from famous people

Social media can and will work for you, provided you are smart, creative, interactive, and avoid the obvious and not-so-obvious landmines. Use your best instincts and you will likely do well.

MARCIE

*Savvy Book Marketer

__________________

Download your complimentary copy of the highly useful Website Design & Marketing worksheet from Write | Market | Design.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

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Wednesday, February 22 – 25 social media success tips for authors
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7 things authors can learn from watching the Oscars

Perhaps you were one of the tens of millions who tuned in to watch Hollywood’s biggest night — the 84th Annual Academy Awards. Oscar parties aren’t just for the Hollywood elite; some average folks do it up big, with red carpet events, replete with voting and awards for most correct guesses. Whether you attended a private Oscar gala or watched from the comfort of your couch in an old pair of sweats, Savvy Book Marketers can take a few lessons from watching the Academy Awards.

  1. There’s no accounting for taste. My father used to repeat this phrase again and again, usually with the not-so-thinly veiled intention of letting me know he didn’t like what I was wearing, reading, writing, watching, etc. Well, I saw five of the nine films nominated for Best Picture and liked two of them, but even those didn’t seem strong enough to receive Best Picture nods. So it’s true. There is no accounting for why one person loves a movie  or a book  and another hates it. That’s great news for authors, because it means there’s probably an audience for your book somewhere. If you’re writing a business book, it might help to know what the audience wants first. If you’re writing fiction, you may have to go out and find your audience. Either way, your audience is out there waiting for you to connect with them.
  2. The best nominee doesn’t always win. A friend of mine feels Viola Davis was robbed last night. That’s not mine to say. Sometimes, the Academy coalesces around an actor you don’t think deserves to win. The same can be true of books. Ever wonder why a certain middling writer becomes popular? (A) They’re in the right place at the right time. (B) It’s who they know. (C) A little luck goes a long way. (D) All of the above. Create your own luck by leveraging all or your resources to position yourself to your own best advantage.
  3. You’re never too old. With nearly 200 acting credits to his name  some of them truly outstanding performances  one would have thought Christopher Plummer might have won an Oscar before now. Not only did it take till this year for him to earn the honor of oldest Oscar winner ever at age 82, but he was not even nominated until 2009. If you’ve been telling yourself you can’t write this book because you’re too old, throw that excuse out the window. Age is just a number, and it has no impact on your ability to write, publish, market, and sell a great book.
  4. Don’t do it for the glory. With 17 Oscar nominations, Meryl Streep was lauded last night as the actor with the most nominations of all time. Yet it was 30 years between last night’s win for her role in The Iron Lady and her prior win for Sophie’s Choice. But who would argue that she has made anything but amazing films in those last 30 years? While it may be true that it’s just an honor to be nominated, had she been motivated by the glory alone, she might have given up a long time ago. If you write with passion, your audience will feel that passion and connect with you much better than if you write for the paycheck or the glory.
  5. Make it long enough, but no longer. Did you notice that the awards program ended at 9:38 last night? Yes, they’ve shortened things up a bit by having one presenter hand out multiple awards, but this show felt uncharacteristically short. Additionally, I saw only one winner go over time with their acceptance speech. One of the first questions new authors often ask me is “How long should my book be?” Like the Academy Awards, it should be long enough, but no longer. Of course, if it’s 50 pages, it’s more like a booklet than a book, but there’s a new trend toward short works, so that may be a good thing. Write long enough to thoroughly cover your topic  then stop.
  6. Hire an entertaining host for your event. What would the Oscars be without the host? A circus with no ringmaster, essentially. But as we saw last year, the experience and skill of the host makes a big difference. Fame and beauty aren’t enough to carry the job. Having a host for your book launch event enables you to be fully present without worrying over all the details. You’re there to read, talk, answer questions, and sign books. You don’t have to greet the guests, serve the food, coordinate the seating, or bother about any of those details. Whether it’s one helper or a team, get others involved in your book launch.
  7. Rehearse your speech ahead of time. After watching about a half-dozen people fumble through their acceptance speeches, my husband turned to me and asked, “If you knew you were nominated, wouldn’t you prepare a few words, just in case you won?” Yes. Yes I would. And authors, you never know who you’re going to  meet, so make sure you’ve rehearsed a brief description of your book well enough that when the time comes, you can say it without fumbling or going on and on till the other person walks away out of boredom. Rehearse your book pitch till it rolls off your tongue fluidly!

Happy movie watching!

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

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What YOU believe is real

The other day, I found myself pondering the phrase “How you do one thing is how you do everything,” and dismissing it, yet again. For instance, I’m incredibly organized in certain areas of my life – my computer files and blog, for example. Laundry, on the other hand, does not have the same priority, so it doesn’t get the same attention. How I do the laundry is not how I blog. I’ve never liked or believed this particular line of alleged motivational thinking.

Soon after, my mind flitted to a trip my husband and I want to take – and my thought was, “We’ve got to try to get that deposit in on time.” Immediately, I found myself tossing that idea aside, instead calling on Yoda’s famous line: “Do. Or do not. There is no try.” You see, Yoda’s aphorism is one I believe.

So why is one saying believable for me, while I dismiss the other one entirely? The answer is quite simple: because I choose to believe one and choose not to believe the other. I CHOOSE. No one outside of me makes a phrase true or untrue for me. It’s really just another way of looking at the Law of Attraction, or the concept that whatever you think about, you bring about. What YOU believe is real.

What if … someone told the Wright brothers they were idiots for thinking humans could fly, and they’d believed that person? What if … someone close to JFK had told him that going to the moon was a fantasy and he should come back down to Earth, and he’d listened to that advisor? What if … someone told Oprah, Bill Gates, Bono, Steve Jobs, Madonna, or any other accomplished person that he or she would never amount to anything, and they’d believed the naysayers?

Who are you listening to? The people who support you and tell you your book is brilliant and that you will go far with it, or the people who are threatened by your desire for success and want to keep you in the small box they find so comfortable? What YOU believe is real.

If you’ve been making a habit of believing the wrong stuff, STOP. If that means you have to get new friends, get new friends. If your writers’ group is full of whining wannabes who will never take the steps necessary to actually publish their work, find another writers’ group. If your spouse or family is unsupportive, make whatever peace you can with that, but go out and surround yourself with people who do support you. Meetup groups are a dime a dozen these days. Facebook and LinkedIn have great group tools for you to find others with common interests. Use NearbyTweets if you prefer Twitter. Just find a support network. It’s out there waiting for you.

What YOU believe is real. Isn’t it time you make it so?

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

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Beware those who call themselves “social media EXPERTS”

With all this talk of social media, I was reminded of an episode that occurred a year or so ago. I was invited to a “luncheon” that turned out to be nothing more than a thinly disguised sales presentation with a little serving of Vienna sausages. I am NOT exaggerating. More problematic than the food or the surprise sales pitch was the fact that the pitcher wasn’t very good at his service. Want to guess what his service was? Yeppers – social media.

This fledgling company was promising viral Internet penetration through the use of social media. But when I looked at the company’s own social media presence, I could hear crickets chirping. The only company on Twitter with a name even similar to theirs was in Australia; we’re in Phoenix. Nothing on YouTube. But they did have a Facebook page – with 10 “Likes.”

For a moderate fee, they were promising to not only manage my social media for me, but to also to help take me viral on the Web. As we noted the other day, it’s really difficult to manufacture viral.

The story gets better, though. When the presenter (and, I presume, head of the company) asked me if I was ready to sign up, I had to tell him honestly that I had some doubts. I’d checked his stats on three of the most visible SM platforms at the time, and the results were insignificant, at best. First, he insisted that I was looking at the wrong numbers. This was about viral influence, not just their statistics. “Really? But how can you influence anyone if you have only 10 followers?” No real answer for that one except to keep repeating that I just didn’t understand – and maybe they didn’t want me as a client anyway. “It’s by exclusive invitation, you know.” Next, he went home and unfriended me on Facebook. OK, then.

Here’s the thing. Would you use a dentist with bad teeth? Visit a hairdresser with terrible hair? Invest with a financial advisor who drove a beat-up jalopy? Probably not. We generally expect our experts to actually embody the product or service they’re selling. It’s one reason politicians who champion public schools and then send their kids for private education so often meet resistance. The message is incongruous with the messenger! In the same way, shouldn’t a social media company have proven a bit of savvy with the tools before offering their services to other people?

For a while there, it seemed every other person I met was adding “social media expert” to their list of skills and services. One guy on Twitter remarked, “That’s like saying you’re an expert at using the phone or sending an e-mail.” While that’s not exactly true – social media is still in its infancy and is morphing and growing daily – he does make a fair point. I think there are a rare few who can really call themselves social media experts. These are the people who are monitoring and measuring the trends, the ones who can tell us what’s coming up next while we’re still trying to master the last SM wave. They’re writing the blog posts I use as source material. And you know what else? They’re really in it – with lots of friends/followers/connections.

I honestly believe the thing that makes social media work is that it’s personal. Can you hire someone to be personal for you? Maybe. But they’ve got to know you and your book business really, really well. And then you’ve got to trust them. To speak for you. To write for you. To comment for you. To connect for you. To enhance and preserve your reputation for you. That’s a lot of trust.

Social media is a great way to shorten the sales cycle, take the temperature of your readers and followers, get to know new people, and generally make a name for yourself. I would think long and hard before deciding to outsource it, and then hire only someone with stellar references who’s been doing it well for a while.

Happy connecting!

Laura

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

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A few general last words on social media for authors – for now

Our last few posts have simply been an overview of social media and ways you, as an author, can begin to use it as a marketing tool. Scads of eBooks have already been written about social media, and it seems a new one is coming out weekly. The thing is, the mediums change so quickly that as soon as you buy a book, it’s probably obsolete. It takes effort and energy to stay on top of them all, but you’ll do that if social media is important to you.

The new SM darling of the moment seems to be Pinterest – a pinboard-style social photo sharing site that allows users to create and manage theme-based collections of images. The site’s mission statement is “to connect everyone in the world through the ‘things’ they find interesting.” But that’s just what the high tide brought in last week. Watch for the next wave; it’s coming up behind you quickly, even if you can’t see it yet.

We touched briefly on this in the last SM post, but it bears repeating again. Although many of us have profiles and are active, to varying degrees, on many SM sites, each site has a different audience and purpose. Not every medium is for every author. Find the ones that work for you. Start by finding one you seem to enjoy, and experiment with it. If you find yourself creating high-quality relationships there, think about branching out to other sites as they make sense and your schedule can adapt to allow regular participation.

Personally, I find the Facebook writing and author groups much friendlier and more interactive than those on LinkedIn – but some might prefer the “professionalism” of those on LinkedIn. For me, Twitter is more of a resource for information on marketing and the publishing industry and a great way to connect with my contemporaries. Then, as Chuck Wendig writes on the Terrible Minds blog, “the blog is the central tentpole to the whole goddamn circus.”

Facebook has become so ubiquitous across the Web that it’s easy to link to it from almost any site or platform. If you’re on Facebook, make sure you link your blog, your website, and all your other SM profiles to your Facebook author page. (If you don’t have a Facebook author page, we need to talk! And we’ll be discussing it in an upcoming post.) And where possible, link your other social media accounts to each other.

Building relationships – the primary goal of SOCIAL media – takes an active exchange of thoughts and ideas. This is why I discourage automation. Posting by bot is anything but personal. To quote Wendig again, “Ensure that you do more than share links. Contribute original thoughts. Add conversation. Say something.” It’s easy to post and sit back and wait for the readers/followers/friends to come to you – but that’s not an exchange; it’s a monologue. Interactivity is how you build relationships.

When it comes to interacting, “Like” and “Share” things that genuinely appeal to you – not because someone asked you to like or share them. And, in the converse – this is just my opinion, now – don’t go around asking other people to like/share your stuff. If it’s genuinely good, people will pass it on. It’s hard to deliberately manufacture viral, especially by trying to copy a clever concept someone else has already used with success. (For example, how been-there-done-that are all those “Got whatever?” signs, t-shirts, and bumper stickers?) I’ll admit, The Oatmeal was quite inspirational in my decision to create this blog. But my blog is educational and instructional; The Oatmeal is often viral, funny, and very, very clever. I’d be lying if I said I wouldn’t love for Marcie to go viral. We’re nowhere near that yet, although we are poised to top 10,000 views by the end of our first year, thanks to you SBM* readers!

Social media works if you use it. Social media works if you share authentically. Social media works if you show up regularly and interact on a personal level. Social media works if you don’t spam people with too many sales pitches. Most of all, social media works if you enjoy it. If you see it as a chore, just another thing on your to-do list, you probably aren’t going to see rave results. As with just about everything in life, you get out what you put into it.

Next week, we’ll start exploring some of the more popular social media platforms in some detail. In the meantime, happy connecting!

MARCIE


*Savvy Book Marketer

__________________

Download your complimentary copy of the highly useful Website Design & Marketing worksheet from Write | Market | Design.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

PREVIOUS POSTS

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Wednesday, February 22 – 25 social media success tips for authors
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Come learn from the book marketing master: John Kremer is holding a seminar in Tempe, AZ on March 31st

Hello, fabulous SBMs*!

If you’ve been following us for a while, you’re learning lots to help you market your books. But if you want to supercharge your strategies and learn how to promote and market your books more effectively in 2012, you’ll want to check this out …

John Kremer, Book marketer extraordinaire and author of 1001 Ways to Market Your Books, will be giving a one-day seminar in the Phoenix area on March 31st.

Here are a few of the topics Mr. Kremer will cover during this power-packed seminar:

  • The top 10 things you can do in 2012 to sell more books
  • The keys to setting up and carrying out an effective virtual book tour
  • How to have your book, your website, and your brand go viral across the Internet
  • The inside secrets to developing relationships that will help you sell a lot more books
  • And much more …

Kick-start your 2012 book marketing efforts with a fully loaded plan to accelerate your book sales for the next 12 months – and beyond! In one day, John will teach you all the latest secrets successful book authors and publishers are using to sell more books every day.

To sign up for this insider’s Book Marketing to the Max seminar for only $89 (discounted from $130 for Marcie’s friends), click here: http://bit.ly/BMMaxArizona. At this price, even if you’re outside Arizona, this is an investment worth making!

DETAILS

Date: Saturday, March 31st, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Location: The Fiesta Resort, 2100 S. Priest Drive, Tempe Ariz. 85282; 480-967-1441; 800-528-6481; http://fiestainnresort.com.

Reserve Your Seat: http://bit.ly/BMMaxArizona

Note: The hotel is just a few minutes from the Phoenix airport. The hotel offers a free shuttle service.

BONUS: If you register for this seminar before March 10th, you’ll also receive a free ebook version of 1001 Ways to Market Your Books, as well as three other eBooks worth $100. But you must sign up by March 10th at http://bit.ly/BMMaxArizona.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Laura

*Savvy Book Marketers

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page to meet other authors and aspiring authors who have a sincere interest in writing, publishing, and selling the best books they can. And if you need a self-publishing consultant in your corner for anything from advice on structure to developing a marketing strategy, drop us a note at MarcieBrock@WriteMarketDesign.com or give us a call at 602.518.5376!

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