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Archive for August, 2011

If bookstores were properly categorized…

Oh, how I wish I could take credit for this one! Here is a delightful excerpt from Italo Calvino’s If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler. Book lovers near and far will be able to relate to this!

Sections in the Bookstore

  • Books You Haven’t Read
  • Books You Needn’t Read
  • Books Made for Purposes Other than Reading
  • Books Read Even Before You Open Them, Since They Belong to the Category of Books Read Before Being Written
  • Books That if You Had More than One Life, You Would Certainly Also Read, but Unfortunately Your Days Are Numbered
  • Books You Mean to Read But There Are Others You Must Read First
  • Books Too Expensive Now and You’ll Wait ‘Til They’re Remaindered
  • Books ditto When They Come Out in Paperback
  • Books You Can Borrow from Somebody
  • Books That Everybody’s Read So It’s as if You Had Read Them, Too
  • Books You’ve Been Planning to Read for Ages
  • Books You’ve Been Hunting for Years Without Success
  • Books Dealing with Something You’re Working on at the Moment
  • Books You Want to Own So They’ll Be Handy Just in Case
  • Books You Could Put Aside Maybe to Read This Summer
  • Books You Need to Go with Other Books on Your Shelves
  • Books That Fill You with Sudden, Inexplicable Curiosity, Not Easily Justified
  • Books Read Long Ago Which It’s Now Time to Re-read
  • Books You’ve Always Pretended to Have Read and Now It’s Time to Sit Down and Really Read Them
  • Books You Love but Wouldn’t Be Caught Dead Holding on the Subway**
  • Books You’ve Lent to Someone, but You Can’t Remember Who**
  • Books to Inspire Your Own Writing**

This is a pretty thorough list, but if you have any to add, please do so in the comment section. The double-asterisks (**) are my own additions.

Happy reading er browsing, and then reading!

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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Two things you can do next: (1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it. (2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

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Linen Laid & Felt — Utterly GORGEOUS Handmade Books

If you are a bibliophile who loves the physicality of books … their texture, weight, covers, smell, artistry, design … you MUST visit Linen Laid & Felt, a site hosted by handmade book artist, Katie Gonzalez. She describes herself this way:

I’m a cardigan-wearing bookbinder living and working in Nashville, Tennessee with my husband and my dog. I studied the art of bookmaking in Cortona, Italy during the summer of 2006. My work channels traditional techniques into bright, contemporary books that emphasize textures, colors, and patterns. Archival materials make these books — whether journals, photo albums, guest books, or sculptural expressions — into long-lasting works of art. I want to share my works in progress and the photography, sewing, printmaking, and other arts that inspire me.

This site is luscious and rich, even if you’re  not that into the whole bookbinding process. Take a look, and let Katie know if you like her stuff!

Happy page-turning!

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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Two things you can do next: (1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it. (2) Visit Laura’s other blog, Write| Market | Design.

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How to Make a Zine: First of 5 easy ways to give away samples of your writing

We already went through the 5 easy ways to give away FREE SAMPLES of your writing to readers and prospective readers. Now it’s time to get down to business. Today we’re going to focus on #1, learning how to create a zine. This really couldn’t be an easier project, but you can make it as simple or elaborate as you like. Some traditionalists prefer to hand-letter and draw their pages. I find it easier to print the pages, not to mention that you wind up with a more professional looking result.

The necessary supplies are quite basic:

  • 8-1/2 by 11 sheet of paper
  • Scissors
  • Tape (optional)

STEP 1

Get a sheet on 8-1/2 by 11 paper.

STEP 2

Fold in half horizontally.

 STEP 3Fold each of those halves to the middle to create 4 equal sections.

STEP 4

Fold in half vertically to create 8 equal sections.

STEP 5

Pay attention to the numbering of the pages.
Also pay attention to the gray line in the very middle
of these sections, as this is where you will make
your single cut to create the zine.

STEP 6

Fold the sheet into an accordion fold
and make one cut along the red lines.

STEP 7

Now you can see where your cut gapes as an opening.

STEP 8

Push the sides together to form a cross.

TADA

Voila! Fold the pages over to form your zine.

If you choose, you can tape closed the open sides of your zine to give it a little more finished look. And that’s all there is to it!

If you’d like to see the steps of folding a zine in progress, take a look at this video.

Make sure to check in on Monday when we’ll be discussing the process of using a PDF as a means for giving away free samples of your work. In the meantime, if you try to make a zine, come back and share you pictures and/or tell us how it worked for you!

MARCIE

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Visit Write | Market | Design to download your Marketing Skills Evaluation. This will help you determine how close you are to SBM status, and where you may need a little extra boost.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

PREVIOUS POSTS

Monday, August 8 – 5 easy ways to give away FREE SAMPLES of your writing

Thursday, August 4 A Savvy Book Marketer embraces the idea of giving freely

Monday, August 1 Every Savvy Book Marketer has an attitude of GRATITUDE

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Please, please, please can we get the apostrophes out of our plurals?!

I just saw it AGAIN, the incorrect use of an apostrophe with a word that simply wants to be plural. The biggest irony is that it was in the first line of a blog post about the importance of creating a quality book.

I’m not sure where this crazy concept originated or why it seems to have taken such a strong and endless hold in the writing of seemingly intelligent people, folks who certainly should know better. The thing that most bothers and perplexes me is the sheer randomness of it, as the people who make this error don’t do it every time.

Here’s a sample sentence:

There are many ways for author’s
and speakers to market themselves.

Why would we throw a random apostrophe in with the authors, but leave the speakers alone? If we’re going to make this nonsensical mistake, shouldn’t we at least be consistent about it?

Let’s take a look at the correct use of apostrophes, in a perhaps vain attempt to curb some of the inappropriate usage.

SINGULAR POSSESSIVE

___________________

 PLURAL POSSESSIVE

____________________

 CONTRACTIONS

____________________

             SPELLING OUT TIME

____________________

 OK, against my better judgment, I’m going to mention the only caveats
I am aware of for using apostrophes to create plurals.

EXCEEDINGLY RARE EXCEPTIONS FOR PLURALS

That’s it. There are NO apostrophes in:

  • the simple plural form of an ordinary word like authors
  • an abbreviation like CDs or MP3s
  • a decade like the 1980s
  • the possessive words its, hers, his, yours, theirs, and ours

This is basic grammar that we all should have mastered by the sixth grade, yet it’s one of the most pervasive mistakes to have crept into mainstream usage over the last few years. It’s also the one that makes a writer look sloppier (or more uneducated) than almost any other error. Random Capital Letters are another one, but even they are not as glaring as this inappropriate addition of apostrophes to plural words.

When possible, have someone read over any writing you will publish for public consumption. When that’s not possible, just keep in mind that apostrophes have a few very specific jobs; creating plurals of words is not one of them.

Here’s to happy, effortless, and correct writing!

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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We invite you to do two things next:

(1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it.

(2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

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Authors, your readers would love to know what YOU’RE READING! A list of lists…

The other night, I came across a wonderful list of books about dragons. The list maker, obviously a huge fantasy fiction fan, had painstakingly drawn up an extensive list of dragon books, including cover shots. Now I loved the movie Dragonslayer and even thought the lady dragon in Shrek was cute, but I’m not much of a fantasy fiction fan. Nevertheless, I found this list compelling enough to share on my Facebook page.

It also got me to thinking about who creates such a list and what the value might be in doing so. I’ve been subscribed to GoodReads.com almost since its inception, but beyond the first dozen or so books I listed, I’ve never added a title nor paid much attention to it. I suppose I read what I want, whatever strikes my fancy (or need) at the time, but I seldom seem to consult others for ideas.

I worked with a guy a few years back, though, who read only thrillers. Not only that, he read only thrillers by authors he already knew. Seriously. I couldn’t believe someone would be so limited in their reading choices, but the only way this guy would try a new author was if they were strongly recommended by someone he trusted, and even then, he did so with great skepticism.

The fact is, some people just prefer to have someone recommend titles to them, perhaps because it’s easier than staring at the millions of books on Amazon or the gazillion titles in a book store or library and trying to choose one.

I think this can benefit authors, because one thing your readers always want is to know more about you. And what better way to do that than by sharing your own reading list? If you don’t have one, maybe you could compile one around a topic of interest to you.

The dragons list compelled me to look for other lists. Not all are as well done as the dragons, but some are much more exhaustive. Perhaps my list of lists will give you a jumping off point for creating your own list.

Books about NURSES

Books about HERMITS

Books about GRANDMOTHERS

Books about BEEKEEPERS

Books about PIRATES

Books about PLAYWRIGHTS

Books about U.S. PRESIDENTS

Books about DOGS

Books about the CIRCUS

Books about GHOSTS

Books not about, but by SCIENTISTS

Books by DEAD AUTHORS

Writers writing on the topic of WRITING (not necessarily books)

Happy reading and list-making!

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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We invite you to do two things next:

(1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it.

(2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

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5 easy ways to give away FREE SAMPLES of your writing

(Please click on image to enlarge.)

Last time, we discussed the importance of getting your work in front of prospective readers by giving away sample chapters and other writings for free. The most obvious way to do this is with a blog, and in future posts, we will explore some interesting ideas for the kinds of blog posts SBMs* can use to keep their readers interested and invested.

Today, we’re going to examine 5 other easy ways to give your readers and potential readers access to your work.

One-page Zine Seen more often in underground publishing than in general use by traditional authors, a zine is a single 8-1/2 by 11 sheet of paper, folded into 8 “pages.” These make great leave-behind materials for coffee shops and bookstores.
PDF Making a PDF from a Word or InDesign or almost any other kind of file is a simple process. Many eReaders will even read .TXT files, so you may be able to keep it simpler still. You can make these files available for download through your blog or Web site.
Amazon’s “Look Inside” Feature Check almost any topic on Amazon, and you may be amazed at how few authors take advantage of the “Look Inside” program that gives potential buyers a way to see your TOC, sample chapters, and a “surprise” page.
DVD Take that PDF from the earlier example, and load it onto a CD or DVD and put it in a DVD case. Reprint your cover, or design a new one for this purpose and slide it under the plastic protector. Now you can carry your ebook with you.
Minibük Literally a mini book, this tiny book is the size of an index card. Page counts can range from 8 pages to 200 pages, with either saddle stitch or perfect binding, depending on the page count.

Choose any of these methods that works for you – or develop your own idea! Regardless of how you get them out there, get those sample chapters out there into the wide, wide world. Embrace giving. We’re not all going to be the next Amanda Hawking, but our success is guaranteed to increase the more we give people a chance to see samples of our work.

For the next 5 posts, we’re going to look at the mechanics of each of these formats for book samples (with illustrations, where applicable), so come back and tell your friends!

MARCIE

*Savvy Book Marketer

__________________

Visit Write | Market | Design to download your Marketing Skills Evaluation. This will help you determine how close you are to SBM status, and where you may need a little extra boost.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

PREVIOUS POSTS

Thursday, August 4 A Savvy Book Marketer embraces the idea of giving freely

Monday, August 1 Every Savvy Book Marketer has an attitude of GRATITUDE

Thursday, July 28 – Is your book a word-of-mouth worthy Purple Cow?


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There’s NO SUCH THING as a nonfiction novel!

If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you may have come to know my penchant for, “This should go without saying, but…” THIS ONE definitely should go without saying, but there it was, on an indie book review blog:

This blog is for novels (over 50,000 words) by indie writers in any of the following fiction or non-fiction categories:  action / adventure / chick lit / drama / fantasy / historical / horror / mystery / thriller / romance / and science fiction.

Seriously. I’m not making this up. I’m not going to name the blogger here, but if you’re on the Google, you can figure it out with a few key strokes. HOW can someone post that they’re reviewing only novels … and then say they’ll accept books “in any of the following fiction or nonfiction categories”?

Let’s clarify this once and for all.

FICTION: Prose literature, esp. short stories
and novels (i.e., not poetry), about IMAGINARY
events and people.

NONFICTION: Prose writing based on FACTS,
such as biography or history… or science or politics
or music or medicine or publishing or sports or …

Thanks, Wikipedia, for the definitions.

Therefore, a novel can never be either fiction or nonfiction. It is always fiction. Period.

There is a relatively new genre known as Creative Nonfiction (also known as literary or narrative nonfiction) , which is described as writing that uses literary styles and techniques to create factually accurate narratives. It’s still FACTUAL, though, so it’s still NONfiction; however, it uses literary devices often found in novels and other fictional writing.

On the other hand, some novels are based on real-life incidents; historical fiction is one such genre. You may have seen TV crime dramas based on true stories and real characters; they are fictionalized versions of the stories on which they are based. One would never confuse an episode of Law and Order (fiction) with an episode of Cops (nonfiction). Fiction can contain real characters set in actual places the distinction is that the story is make-believe.

Are these the thing that are confusing people? I wish I knew. And I wish our indie book review blogger was the only person ever to make this blunder, but she’s not. Lots of people you’d think should know better have done the same. You, on the other hand, have NO more excuses.

Here’s to happy fiction and nonfiction writing!

Laura

P.S. The word “nonfiction” is not hyphenated. That’s another mistake you often see.

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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We invite you to do two things next:

(1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it.

(2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

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Do you remember when your love of reading was born?

EVERY day, I post two writing/book/literary quotes on Facebook: one on my personal page and one on my business page. After a while, as interesting as they are, they sometimes begin  to run together. This one stood out for me, perhaps because I was instantly transported back to that moment when my life was changed forever.

At one magical instant in your early childhood, the page of a book – that string of confused, alien ciphers – shivered into meaning. Words spoke to you, gave up their secrets; at that moment, whole universes opened. You became, irrevocably, a reader.

_Alberto Manguel_

Laura

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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Two things you can do next: (1) Visit the Write | Market | Design Facebook page and “LIKE” it if you like it. (2) Visit Laura’s other blog.

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A Savvy Book Marketer embraces the idea of giving freely.

(Please click on image to enlarge.)

We talked last time about having an attitude of gratitude. One group to whom you own an immense debt of gratitude is your readers – the people who buy your book, review your book, recommend your book, and eagerly await your next book. If you’re marketing your first book, you’re in the process of growing this group.

A quick, easy way to say, “Thanks for taking an interest,” is by giving away excerpts, sample chapters, and stories.

This act of generosity does several things for you:

  • Gives readers who don’t know you a chance to get to read your work for the first time.
  • Gives readers a chance to offer feedback – which you may or may not find helpful.
  • Lets you know if your message/story is resonating with your target market.

Some people have a hesitation to give away their work in advance of publishing it, out of fear that people won’t want it if they can get it for free. If that’s you, I encourage you to think differently about giving people free access to your work.

  1. It’s a lack mentality (aka poverty mindset) that says, “By GIVING you something, I LOSE something. It may be counterintuitive, but that’s honestly the surest way to keep your sales and success small.
  2. Although many people have published the entire contents of their book in a serial format on a blog or other writing platform before they successfully sold it in book form, I’m not actually suggesting you give away the whole book – just a healthy sample.
  3. HOWEVER, giving away the whole thing first CAN work. Master marketer Seth Godin is rumored to have given away 5 MILLION copies of his famous book, Unleashing the Idea Virus, before he sold one. Now, you have to buy it if you want it, and his “free giveaway” put him on the map as one of the world’s top marketers.
  4. The same Seth Godin has said that if you want your book to take off, you’ve got to give away at least 5,000 copies first.

Gone are the days when all you had to do was tell someone about your book to generate interest. Now, you must first create a relationship with them; then you must distinguish yourself from a crowded field. What’s the quickest way to do that? Give your writing away for free. We can’t just go about pushing our books at people anymore; we’ve got to interest them, court them – seduce them, if you will. Only then will they feel they know you well enough to plunk down their money for your book.

Embrace giving – it works!

See you Monday, when we’re going to preview 4 smart ways to embrace giving!

MARCIE

__________________

Visit Write | Market | Design to download your Marketing Skills Evaluation. This will help you determine how close you are to SBM status, and where you may need a little extra boost.

__________________

We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

__________________

PREVIOUS POSTS

Monday, August 1 Every Savvy Book Marketer has an attitude of GRATITUDE

Thursday, July 28 – Is your book a word-of-mouth worthy Purple Cow?

Monday, July 25 – Marketing a book is different than marketing a smartphone or a pair of shoes


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Poor spelling doesn’t equal inferior intelligence, but it does require a Plan B

After a recent conversation with a Facebook pal about her spelling challenges, I was reminded of this voicemail I received from a client a few years back:

Hi, Laura. It’s Elizabeth. I really hope I caught you in time. You know that article I sent you to edit? Don’t open it! I mean, I hope you didn’t look at it yet. I just reread it, and realized it’s terrible. I need to rework it. I’ll see what I can do with it later this afternoon, and send you my improved version tonight or tomorrow. Thanks.

Unfortunately, Elizabeth never sent me the revision.

Funny thing about writing: many people have absolutely ZERO confidence in their ability to do it. What they often fail to realize is that they are much more skilled than they give themselves credit for. And for those whose ability is less than stellar, that’s the whole reason editors have jobs, isn’t it?

What I’d like to convince my client, Elizabeth — and everyone else out there who feels similarly — is that there is absolutely nothing to be ashamed about with regard to their writing skills. No matter how bad the spelling or how egregious the grammar errors, none of that is representative of how smart she is; nor does it diminish the importance of the information she wants to share with her audience.

In a 2000 Suite101.com article, “What Does Your Spelling Say About You Behind Your Back?” Sandra Linville references Marilyn Vos Savant’s book, The Art of Spelling: The Madness and the Method. Vos Savant wrote her book after conducting a 1998 survey in her Parade Magazine column, in which she asked, “What does your spelling really say about you? Is spelling ability a measure of your education, intelligence, desire, or none of the above?”

In her article, Linville explains, “The survey garnered more than 42,000 responses, indicating that better organizational skills benefit spelling ability, rather than intelligence. However, Vos Savant realizes that inept spellers can look inept in other ways. A misspelled word can kill a job offer or result in a rejected proposal. She also states that an English-speaking perfect speller doesn’t exist.”

Corresponding with Vos Savant’s theory, it is widely reputed that Albert Einstein, the unquestionable genius physicist, was so bad at spelling that he was initially assumed to be retarded. In fact, according to the 1998 ScienceGoGo.com article, “Ten Obscure Factoids Concerning Albert Einstein,” Factoid #3 is:

He Was a Rotten Speller. Although he lived for many years in the United States and was fully bilingual, Einstein claimed never to be able to write in English because of “the treacherous spelling.” He never lost his distinctive German accent either, summed up by his catch-phrase “I vill a little t’ink.”

Some now purport that Einstein struggled with dyslexia, a learning disorder that impairs a person’s fluency or comprehension accuracy. However, this claim is only speculative. Nevertheless, spelling is only one of several serious difficulties facing people with dyslexia.

According to Dyslexia-Parent.com, there are four main challenges for a dyslexic person:

1. Spelling
2. Sentence punctuation
3. Handwriting
4. Sequencing ideas

In such a case, lack of intelligence clearly is not the issue for a challenged speller.

There is also the distinction to be made between poor cognitive spelling skills and never having learned to do it properly. As Philip Hensher writes in the UK’s The Independent:

Spelling may, in the end, not be a very reliable indicator of intelligence, and it is certainly possible to imagine very intelligent and articulate people who lack the skill. But society has agreed that it is significant, and there is no doubt that people, at some point in their lives, will be judged partly on the basis of whether they can spell or not. It is simply the job of education to teach that skill, and it is incredible to hear professional teachers sneering at the notion.

I fear that this attitude is not all that unusual, however. A couple of years ago, I agreed to teach a residential course for sixth-formers who were interested in becoming journalists. They were from a disadvantaged part of London, but I would say they were intrinsically bright and capable. I set some written work: it arrived: I held my head in horror. Not one of them was capable of writing 20 words without making a mistake in spelling, and sometimes an elementary one.

The point here is not that they lacked ability, but that their education had never impressed on them the importance of accuracy. It seemed perfectly plausible to them, and to their teachers, that native ability and enthusiasm would be enough to qualify them to write prose for a living. The idea that accuracy might be needed had literally never occurred to them.

One interesting yet seldom-mentioned fact is the converse of this idea that poor spelling is an indication of inferior intelligence, that is, good spelling is NOT necessarily an indication of intelligence. A person may have strong memorization and/or language skills without possessing comprehensive intelligence across all subjects.

Beyond spelling, another consideration is the fact that not all of us are inherently strong in verbal/linguistic skills. Renowned social scientist Howard Gardner developed a model known as multiple intelligences, meaning that although each of us has many ways in which we learn and perceive information, we generally have one primary area where we excel. The eight intelligences Gardner identified are: Verbal/Linguistic, Logical/Mathematical, Visual/Spatial, Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, Bodily/Kinesthetic, Musical/Rhythmic, and Naturalistic.

Although verbal and linguistic may be perceived as the most commonly emphasized of the eight intelligences, there are seven other skill sets at which a person may excel. Verbal/linguistic may be my personal strengths, but just ask my niece about my fiasco as a sub, teaching math to her 6th grade Montessori class.

What it comes down to is this: in business in particular, heighten and hone your natural skills and leverage them as far as you can – but HIRE OUT your weaknesses. Don’t worry that you don’t do it well as you hand over the project to your outsourcee – that’s why you’re hiring them!

My client who said she needed to rewrite her article before she sent it to me reminded me of those people who feel they have to clean their houses before the housekeeper arrives. That one also baffles me. Rather than focus on her imperfections, I wish she could celebrate her wisdom in reaching out for help. If we could all just get past our shame about our deficiencies and instead focus on the things we do well, life would be so much easier.

Laura

Originally posted on March 31, 2007 as “There’s No Shame in Being a Bad Speller/Poor Grammarian” on the blog Communication Made Easy, by Marcie Brock creator, Laura Orsini.

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

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If you are interested in participating in the Facebook Author Discussion Series on the Write | Market | Design page, please complete this survey and someone will get back to you to schedule your session.

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Every Savvy Book Marketer has an attitude of GRATITUDE.

(Please click on image to enlarge.)

You’ve had the weekend to mull it over, so I hope you’ve been giving some thought to how to make your book (or your book marketing campaign) remarkable.

One of the fastest ways to become remarkable is by adopting a daily practice of gratitude. You may be wondering what in the world gratitude has to do with book marketing – or you may  be thinking, “Tell me something I don’t already know!”

A number of years ago, I was at a business development meeting when I was quite surprised to hear a man I knew to be a fairly well-established business coach share with the group a “new discovery.” He stood up and told us how he had recently come to learn about the power of gratitude … and that he planned to begin implementing it as part of his daily routine. I remember thinking, “Really??! You’re 60-something and you’re just figuring that out now?” Later, as the movie The Secret began to take the world by storm, it became clear that this was actually a new concept for a lot of people.

Why is gratitude important, particularly to a successful book-marketing campaign? According to an article by Kevin Eikenberry on SuccessConsciousness.com, gratitude (1) attracts more of what we want, (2) improves relationships, (3) reduces negativity, (4) improves problem-solving skills, and (5) helps us learn.

Let’s break those items down, as they relate to selling books.

  1. What do we want? To sell more books.
  2. How do improved relationships help us sell more books? The stronger your relationships with your readers, the more they will want to buy your books AND tell others about you.
  3. Why do we want to reduce negativity? A book marketing campaign can be stressful; sometimes we’ll meet people who are not supportive. Gratitude helps us stay positive even when our progress is slower than we might like.
  4. What kinds of problems do we need to solve? Everything related to getting our book to market!
  5. Why is it important to keep learning? Even if you’re about to market your 20th book, there are always new tips, tools, and techniques to learn, embrace, and implement.

Whom should you thank? Only you can answer that – you might start with a list of people who helped you create your book and get where you are today. Go back as far as you feel appropriate … maybe even to your junior high creative writing teacher!

The traditional way an author thanks people is on the Acknowledgements page of their book. While that’s very nice and very formal, I’m suggesting something much more personal here. A phone call, an e-mail, a handwritten note, a mention in your blog, a Twitter or Facebook shout-out, a gift certificate to their favorite coffeehouse, an invitation to lunch, a gift basket… You get to decide. You needn’t break the bank to do this – just get creative. What would this individual really appreciate as a thank-you gesture?

Thank at least one person every day and watch your marketing campaign blossom!

See you Thursday!

MARCIE

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Write | Market | Design is sponsoring an Author Discussion Series via our Facebook page. If you are interested in booking YOUR session, please complete this survey and someone will get back to you to schedule you.

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We welcome and encourage your thoughtful, courteous comments below.

__________________

If you’d like us to add a link to your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog, please send us a note. If we think it’s a good fit, we’ll be happy to add you. Of course, we’d appreciate the reciprocity of the same!

Additionally, Marcie would be happy to make a guest appearance on your writing/self-publishing/book marketing blog. Just let us know the theme or your idea (preferably including a 6-panel concept), and we’ll see what we can draft for you.

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Monday, July 28 Is your book a word-of-mouth worthy PURPLE COW?

Monday, July 25 – Marketing a book is different than marketing a smartphone or a pair of shoes

Thursday, July 21Book marketing is like brushing your teethyou have to do it every day

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